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Daytrips from Milan

Print this guide Created by Maureen Jenkins
Daytrips from Milan
Milan is surrounded by a wealth of nearby cities, towns and villages that offer great day-trip options. And they'll take you to the sea, to urban centres, and beyond.
Good for: Families, Groups, Seniors, Individuals
Seasons: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter
19 ratings 19 ratings
 
Lake Como
Lake Como

A gorgeous spot that’s a convenient day trip from Milan, Lake Como recently earned fame as home to Hollywood star George Clooney. But celeb-spotting aside, it’s known for jaw-dropping natural beauty, elegant old villas—and the scenic towns surrounding the lake. Check out Varenna, Bellagio, and Menaggio, which offer great views, historic churches, and water-based activities such as... More

A gorgeous spot that’s a convenient day trip from Milan, Lake Como recently earned fame as home to Hollywood star George Clooney. But celeb-spotting aside, it’s known for jaw-dropping natural beauty, elegant old villas—and the scenic towns surrounding the lake. Check out Varenna, Bellagio, and Menaggio, which offer great views, historic churches, and water-based activities such as ferries and passenger-only boats. Less

Cinque Terre
Cinque Terre

You'll find rugged beauty and a slow pace in the Cinque Terre. Named for the five towns of Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola and Riomaggiore, this portion of the Italian Riviera is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Cars aren't allowed, so take local trains or ferries to go from town to town—or walk one of the spectacular trails that connect them.

Lake Maggiore
Lake Maggiore

On the south side of the Alps, Lake Maggiore is the second largest lake in Italy. Since the climate is mild year-round, the area is filled with Mediterranean vegetation and exotic plants. Lake Maggiore was featured in Ernest Hemingway's infamous novel, A Farewell to Arms, when the protagonist and his lover must row across the lake in order to escape the Italian Carabinieri (think police... More

On the south side of the Alps, Lake Maggiore is the second largest lake in Italy. Since the climate is mild year-round, the area is filled with Mediterranean vegetation and exotic plants. Lake Maggiore was featured in Ernest Hemingway's infamous novel, A Farewell to Arms, when the protagonist and his lover must row across the lake in order to escape the Italian Carabinieri (think police in military uniforms). Here's hoping you won't have any run-ins of that nature. Less

Brescia
Brescia

Set between Milan and Verona at the foot of the Alps, Brescia is the second-largest city in Italy’s northern Lombardy region, with just under 200,000 people. The city’s rich history dates back to pre-Roman times, when it was a Gallic capital. Among the many great local sights are the 11th-century Duomo Vecchio (Old Cathedral, also called La Rotonda), unique for its circular shape, the... More

Set between Milan and Verona at the foot of the Alps, Brescia is the second-largest city in Italy’s northern Lombardy region, with just under 200,000 people. The city’s rich history dates back to pre-Roman times, when it was a Gallic capital. Among the many great local sights are the 11th-century Duomo Vecchio (Old Cathedral, also called La Rotonda), unique for its circular shape, the 17th-century Duomo Nuovo (New Cathedral) next door, and the first-century Roman ruins at Tempio Capitolino. Less

Turin
Turin

In Turin, the capital of the Piedmont region of northwest Italy, sports cars and chocolate are a matter of pride. The city is also home to the Museo Egizio, one of the most impressive collections of Egyptian artifacts in the world. A stroll around Piazza Castello and along the Via Roma encompasses many of the must-see sights. Valentino Park houses an 18th-century castle, botanic garden... More

In Turin, the capital of the Piedmont region of northwest Italy, sports cars and chocolate are a matter of pride. The city is also home to the Museo Egizio, one of the most impressive collections of Egyptian artifacts in the world. A stroll around Piazza Castello and along the Via Roma encompasses many of the must-see sights. Valentino Park houses an 18th-century castle, botanic garden and medieval village. When you've worked up an appetite, sample casual trattorias for pastas, regional wines and coffees. Less

Province of Bergamo
Province of Bergamo

Located in northwest Italy’s Lombardy region, the province of Bergamo offers more than just a day-trip diversion from the big city of Milan. This hilltop town is known for its architectural gems, including medieval and Renaissance structures that continue to amaze tourists and locals alike. Don’t miss the historic Piazza Vecchia with its 12th and 16th century buildings. And Bergamo’s... More

Located in northwest Italy’s Lombardy region, the province of Bergamo offers more than just a day-trip diversion from the big city of Milan. This hilltop town is known for its architectural gems, including medieval and Renaissance structures that continue to amaze tourists and locals alike. Don’t miss the historic Piazza Vecchia with its 12th and 16th century buildings. And Bergamo’s Galleria dell’Accademia Carrara is an art gallery featuring works from Italian legends including Botticelli, Titian, Canaletto and Raphael, to name a few. Less

Parma
Parma

Best known for its incredibly edible contributions to world gastronomy (especially parmigiano cheese and Parma ham), Parma has also been revered by opera lovers (who flock to its Teatro Regio) since the days of Verdi, who was born in nearby Roncole. Parma’s many historic sights include the 11th-century cathedral and its baptistry. Begun in the 12th century, it's considered one of... More

Best known for its incredibly edible contributions to world gastronomy (especially parmigiano cheese and Parma ham), Parma has also been revered by opera lovers (who flock to its Teatro Regio) since the days of Verdi, who was born in nearby Roncole. Parma’s many historic sights include the 11th-century cathedral and its baptistry. Begun in the 12th century, it's considered one of medieval Europe’s most important buildings for its straddling of the Romanesque and Gothic architecture periods. Less

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.