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Alexandra Bridge Provincial Park

43 Reviews
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Alexandra Bridge Provincial Park

43 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
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Trans Canada Highway Old Cariboo Highway and Trans-Canada Highway, Spuzzum, British Columbia Canada
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10YEN10 wrote a review Nov. 2020
New Westminster, Canada176 contributions36 helpful votes
Keep in mind that the visit to this site was when there was slushy snow on the ground...past that this is a nice break to stretch your legs and get some fresh air. The walk down to the bridge is all downhill--keep this in mind if you have mobility issues of have smaller children--the walk back is all uphill! You do cross a set of train tracks (which interestingly enough has a sign posted letting you know it's illegal to be on the tracks) on the way to/from the bridge. The base of the bridge is grating so you can see all the way down...not for everyone. On the other side of the bridge there is some great hiking that will probably suit any level of hiker. As always when entering the backcountry--have a plan, be prepared and let someone know where you are. This can be dangerous terrain--even the easy walks.
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Date of experience: November 2020
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Vancity Adventure wrote a review Nov. 2020
Vancouver, Canada14 contributions
Vancity Adventure a youtuber. You know we all get stuck in a rut in life. getting out and making your self one with nature is a great way to relax and unwind. Today we traveled from Lillooet back home finding an old bridge and being cut off by a train.
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Date of experience: August 2020
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Jimvcr wrote a review Aug. 2020
Vancouver, Canada157 contributions64 helpful votes
As others have said, this is about a 15 min walk down to the bridge. You can walk across the bridge and get some great views of the Fraser river and pictures of the old bridge. The walk back to the parking lot is uphill so just be prepared for that. Took lots of great pictures.
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Date of experience: August 2020
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AMD wrote a review May 2020
2 contributions1 helpful vote
Othello Tunnels was closed so we decided to check out this site. We had no idea how rich in history this location is but after coming home and reading about it, I'm excited to go back! We had two young kids and a dog with us. The walk down to the bridge is fairly easy but could be steep going back up for some and you have to cross a live train track which I can see as being a little dangerous. The bridge itself is spectacular; however, the metal grates to walk on made it hard for our yellow lab...so my husband carried her across the entire bridge (there and back). We decided to continue walking up the trail on the other side of the bridge thru the forest. We came to a 2nd railway track, crossed it and contiued following another trail. As we continued up this trail, it was becoming more grown over the farther we went, and lots of fallen trees. Before turning around to head back to the bridge, we saw the COOLEST thing! An old vintage truck that had fallen down the hill and was stuck on a tree. Plants and vegetation are starting to grow on it so we assume its been there for a few decades! I love to find a trail map or know more information as to where this trail leads too! This second trail would be a more moderate level. More signage about the additional trails and more historic information on site would be beneficial.
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Date of experience: May 2020
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PookyCake wrote a review Mar. 2020
Victoria, Canada11,162 contributions998 helpful votes
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The Alexandra Bridge that we see today is technically located just outside the borders of Alexandra Bridge Provincial Park. It is also the second bridge located in the immediate area. The first Alexandra Bridge was built in 1863 by Joseph Trutch and functioned as a vital link in the Cariboo Wagon Road, bridging the southern part of the colony of British Columbia and the burgeoning north. Prospectors and explorers thus had relatively easy access to the booming Cariboo gold rush of the 1860s, which was centered at Barkerville. In this way, the first Alexandra Bridge played a small but vital role in developing the economy of the colony. Unfortunately, the Alexandra Bridge fell into significant disuse less than 20 years after it was built, having been superseded by the expansion of the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National railway systems in the early 1880s. The first Alexandra Bridge was subsequently destroyed by the great Fraser River floods of 1894 and finally dismantled in 1912. The original footings of this bridge are still visible under the current (second) Alexandra Bridge, which was built in 1926. The second Alexandra Bridge – the focus of this review – was built in response to the Province opening the Fraser Canyon up to road traffic in the early 1920s. Built as a steel and concrete suspension bridge, this new Alexandra Bridge, like its predecessor, was vital to the completion and expansion of the new Cariboo Highway. When you visit this bridge today, one cannot help but be struck by how narrow it is; however, at the time it was built, this bridge was a marvel of construction and engineering, especially given the challenging and difficult geography of the site. Despite not being used for vehicle traffic since 1964, the bridge remains in decent shape and is a popular tourist destination for those traveling through the Fraser Canyon. Besides its historic and cultural significance, the Alexandra Bridge offers stunning views of the Fraser’s rushing waters and steep, rocky walls. For a history buff like me, the brief stop we were afforded here proved to be a real treat. We were continuing our road trip through the Fraser Canyon, following a stopover at Hell’s Gate; however, a sudden and urgent need for washroom facilities by my grandfather necessitated a stop at Alexandra Bridge Provincial Park. Having previously read about the bridge, I knew this was an ideal time to check it out. Signage to the bridge is kind of poor, but once you find the trail – which is actually part of the old Cariboo Highway – it’s an easy 15-minute walk from the parking area. Knowing something about the history of this bridge, finally seeing it in person was a bit awe-inspiring. As you walk across its open-weave metal decking, you can’t help but imagine what it must’ve been like to drive a car across this platform. If you cross the entirety of the Alexandra Bridge, you can walk along sections of both the old highway and historic Cariboo Wagon Road. I’m told you can hike along the former wagon road for about an hour before it’s lost to the forest. While some might see the Alexandra Bridge as just a relic of history good for some scenic views, it is, of course, much more than that. In school, we read about the Cariboo gold rush and the difficulties explorers had in navigating the Fraser Canyon. The current Highway 1 utilizes parts of the old “Gold Rush Trail,” but rarely do we think we’ll get an opportunity to see the original route. The Alexandra Bridge and its associated “path” provide us with that very opportunity. In this way, the old bridge functions as a symbol of the evolving transportation history of the Fraser. Today, the old Alexandra Bridge literally leads nowhere – the old highway and wagon road it connected absorbed by the forest. Maybe the ghosts of the old prospectors still roam this area? Maybe they haunt an old cabin still standing along the historic, grown-in road? Such thoughts certainly add a bit of spice to the already enticing history. But history ebbs and flows; or, in the case of the Fraser River below, swirls hectically. With the ongoing modernization of the roadways, the “Alexandra Bridge” name was given to another bridge, built in the 1960s, as part of the new Highway 1. The historic (second) bridge was finally given its due when it was recognized as a Historic Place of Canada in 2011. I say it’s about time. In any event, after you’ve finished visiting this piece of history and contemplated its importance, why not stroll back up to the parking are and enjoy an apple growing on the trees? We certainly did. It was a nice treat and good way to round out the first part of our road adventure.
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Date of experience: August 2019
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