Certosa di Padula
Certosa di Padula
4.5
Architectural BuildingsReligious Sites
Monday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
About
Padula Charterhouse, in Italian Certosa di Padula (or Certosa di San Lorenzo di Padula), is a large Carthusian monastery, or charterhouse, located in the town of Padula, in the Cilento National Park (near Salerno) in Southern Italy. It is a World Heritage site.
Duration: More than 3 hours
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Popular mentions

4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles1,442 reviews
Excellent
809
Very good
426
Average
136
Poor
40
Terrible
31

dapper777
Monaco64,405 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2022 • Friends
It is the second time that we visited the Padula Chartehouse. The first time was about 20 years ago.
The Certosa di San Lorenzo or Certosa di Padula is the largest monastic complex in Southern Italy and one of the most interesting in Europe for its architectural magnificence and abundance of artistic treasures.
During the visit it is possible to see many of the rooms where the monks lived and carried out the daily work and contemplation activities prescribed by the Carthusian rule.
The church is of great beauty as well as its altars and their refined decorations with mother-of-pearl inlays, the 16th - 18th century frescoes, the 18th century majolica floor, the original 16th century carved wooden choirs, the the main altar with mother-of-pearl inlays and the rich library.
One of the most important architectural elements of the Charterhouse is the large cloister whose size of about 15,000 m2 makes it the largest in the world.
Also noteworthy is the monumental elliptical staircase in the style
of famed architect Luigi Vanvitelli, built with local stone, that leads to the first floor of the cloister.
The atrium is also noteworthy, dominated by the large Baroque façade and the aforementioned spectacular elliptical Vanvitellian staircase.
Today the Charterhouse is owned by the Italian State.
Recommendef
Written April 27, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

melandrobg
Lovelock, NV34 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2022 • Business
We were in the area with some time to kill. I saw some impressive pictures of the Certosa di Padua and decided it was the perfect place to stop and visit.

We were there on Easter, with few other visitors . It was quiet and peaceful.

I’m so glad we stopped. What a treat to see such history! My 2 teen boys were even impressed.
Written April 17, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Glenn T
Boston, MA10 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2020
Go with local guide Viviana Ricciardone if you can--she is deeply knowledgeable about this monastery. The Certosa is enormous, well-preserved, and, if you like history, art, architecture, and, if you have a family connection to the area like I do, a deep part of one's heritage. There is also an excellent book/gift shop, and the staff were all pleasant and accommodating. I am overdue to review--I was there in June 2019 and it was a very memorable day at the Certosa. If in Padula, it will be a major highlight of the visit.
Written December 8, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Eli B
Sydney, Australia3,557 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
For me, among the most imposing monastic complexes in southern Italy, is this one in Padula, giving a remarkable sense of baroque power and pretension of the church at the time. Padula is within easy driving reach of the autostrada and is in a beautiful setting. One treads on air, so beautiful is the clear sunlight filter through the structure. Its grand but not ponderous
Written August 18, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nick Nell
Naples, Italy142 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2019 • Couples
Every time I'm more and more astonished by the magnificence and greatness of this venue.
Enormous and pompous, with choirs, spiral flights, cellars, chimneys, everything is worthwhile
Written August 15, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Roedig
Stellenbosch, South Africa1,280 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
This monastery is known as certosa of San Lorenzo. It is sitting Padula and the easiest way to get here is aim for the town of Padula. Parking is available at €3 and a short walk takes you to the 50 000 square meter building. An entrance fee of €6 gets you in. You need to buy brief guide at €3, which allows you to walk around the ground floor. The first floor is closed. The gardens are a bit dilapidated. The interior of the building is still relatively well preserved.
Written April 22, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Thomas Ozbun
Vicenza, Italy982 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Friends
It is considered to be the first charter-house built in the Campania region, and the largest in the whole of Italy. Together with Paestum the Cilento National Park and the greek and roman city of Velia it is inscribed in the Unesco World Heritage Site list. Construction on the building started in 1309 and was protracted till the 18th century, with most of it dating to the later period due to alterations and reconstructions.
Dating to the 16th century in a baroque style, the facade is probably one of the most noteworthy features of the whole complex. Once we passed through the entrance we bought our tickets (4 euros full price and 2 euro for student discount) and were given a map of the complex, as it is really large. From there we followed the suggested path, passing through the first cloister called Chiostro della Foresteria, because it was adjacent to the guest lodgings, which had a nice fountain at its center and then entering the church. The interior, dating to the 17th century is a joy of the neapolitan baroque with beautiful decorations, colorful paintings and lavish marbles. We then went through several rooms which included the Hall of the Bells, the Hall of the Chapter and the Hall of the Treasure, all with beautiful baroque decorations. Next was the cloister of the old cemetery and right next to it, through a door, the large Refectory which used to serve as the dining room of the monks. After that we entered the Kitchens, a beautifully preserved example of cooking space (which rarely survives in charterhouses and monasteries) with a huge furnace and chimney at its center and maiolicas decorating the walls. Right beside, through a door, is another cloister, this time very small and in the shadows as it still maintains its 14th century style and architecture. Following the map we reached what were once the Prior's rooms. now housing the Archaeological museum with ancient greek vases, weapons and other objects. There were also two cloisters, the so called Chiostro dei Procuratori and the Prior's cloister which is more like a small italian garden with trees and fountains giving it a peaceful and beautiful setting. Moving on we reached the Great Cloister, an immense rectangular (104x150m) with two floors on all sides and containing the monks' cells. It is in fact the largest cloister in the world, and took us quite a while to walk from one side to the other.
Written January 17, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lana T
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia155 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2018
Good place for spiritual and vibrational recovering))) Beautiful place to visit. I recommend for everyone not to pass by and just to go inside)))
Written January 16, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Valeria Valenti... R
13 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2018 • Family
Padula is a hidden gem. La Certosa has amazing rooms filled with history. The whole place is magic. From the gardens you have the view of the city, little but charming. I want to go back and explore the monument further more.
Written June 27, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

malb465
Jersey City, NJ30 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2017 • Friends
A spacious monastery hidden away from the noise. Beautifully decorated later baroque (almost rococo-like?) interiors that somehow appear "lighter" than their contemporaries in other buildings. You can walk through various rooms of the former monastery, including the cavernous kitchen.
Written November 18, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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