Workers Arts & Heritage Centre

Workers Arts & Heritage Centre

Workers Arts & Heritage Centre
4
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Top ways to experience Workers Arts & Heritage Centre and nearby attractions

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles4 reviews
Excellent
3
Very good
0
Average
0
Poor
0
Terrible
1

MikeandCharleen
St. John's, Canada3 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2016 • Friends
Opening hours were not as shown in your info so could not get in you need to adjust your website to show only open Wed thru Sat
Written February 8, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Villagemayor
Mississauga, Canada102 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2015
Was here for one of the paranormal investigation events in the summer. Great place to learn the history of the area. There is no parking on site so you will have to park at Bayfront Park.
Written December 26, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Wayne B
Brampton, Canada1,052 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2015 • Couples
A truly outstanding landmark building - constructed more than a century and a half ago in 1858. The exterior is absolutely beautiful with its Italianate design and use of a varied combination of stone in it's construction. It has an abundance of ornate trim, cornices, and rounded top windows. Each huge window is fitted with large interior wood shutters that can be closed at night. They still remain operational.

The interior is opulent with soaring ceilings, ultra wide sculpted baseboards and an exquisite wide double landing staircase. The windows are huge and interior archways are nothing short of majestic. The building is filled with light from the many large windows and the original wooden floors harken back to another era.

However, that description only provides an outline of the beauty of the building the museum is in - the museum itself is totally fascinating. Besides outlining the workers and industries that made their home in Hamilton, there is a rich and compelling story, documented in pictures, artifacts and writing, that illustrate the long hard struggle in the 19th - and early 20th century that workers endured, to obtain even the most basic of workers rights. It seems in those early times, the factory bosses were the ultimate and only authority.

One is able to see the almost complete lack of rights that these early workers had. Pre-teenage children working fulltime jobs in a knitting mill, a Hamilton mayor, wearing "sandwich board" sign demanding a 9 hour day and 6 day work week for the factory workers in the city.

Westinghouse, Firestone and 2700 Stelco workers were all out on strike in 1946, a scant 69 years ago, striking to have union recognition and an end to the 48 hour week.

There are several such examples of the early crusading workers that suffered so greatly to provide the foundation for the workplace benefits we enjoy to day. Their's is truly an uplifting story,

There are also a great number of artifacts and displays, along with descriptions of much of the industrial development of early day Hamilton. The size of some of these Hamilton corporations - and the number of workers they employed - was enormous. Stelco, Studebaker, Sawyer-Massey, Otis Elevator, National Steel Car, International Harvester etc.

This museum is must see - it presents a wonderful portrait of workers struggles from days gone by in a most interesting and informative way. It provides a most informative and educational look into the history of labour not only in Hamilton but throughout the then young Dominion of Canada.

At the time of our visit, large scale construction of a rail facility was taking place across the street and parking for the museum was rather limited but I would imagine that to be a rather temporary situation.

Do visit the Museum of Arts and Labour - I am sure you will find it to be a well enjoyed visit.

Wayne and Marilyn
Written October 18, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Doeraymee
Canada327 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2014 • Solo
Great little museum telling a part of a history that's seldom told: working class history. How regular people worked and lived. Two stories of permanent and temporary displays. Plan at least an hour visit. The building itself is worth a visit; it was the old Custom House originally and was used for many other purposes over the last century and a half.
Written August 2, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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