Tower of the Winds

Tower of the Winds, Athens: Address, Phone Number, Tower of the Winds Reviews: 4/5

Tower of the Winds
4
from CA$11.56
Historic Sites • Points of Interest & Landmarks
About
A graceful stone tower dating back to the first century AD.
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Plaka
Due to its proximity to the Acropolis, Plaka remains the area where the majority of foreign visitors stay and play. Its attractive features include small squares, some notable museums and the beautiful Mitropolis cathedral, as well as a host of places to stay, eat and drink. Its pedestrian zones make it a pleasant place to escape from the city’s notorious traffic. Adrianou and Kidathineon Streets contain a number of souvenir shops, offering classier items than you will find in the Flea Market. The most rewarding section to explore is the upper reaches towards the Acropolis itself, where many old stone houses with tiled roofs have survived. Up here you can find leafier corners and the odd quaint taverna with unobstructed views of the ancient rock.
How to get there
  • Monastiraki • 3 min walk
  • Akropoli • 5 min walk
Popular mentions

4.0
343 reviews
Excellent
103
Very good
154
Average
70
Poor
9
Terrible
7

I W
Barrow Upon Soar, UK162 contributions
Interesting
Oct. 2020 • Family
This is an octagonal tower that has carvings on the outside depicting the various winds and housed a water clock, but there was no explanation about what the clock looked like or how it worked. The tower is in the Romans agora so it's worth a look, especially if you have the 30 euro pass. The museum of ancient Greek technology has an example of a water clock, which is also worth a visit.
Written October 28, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

permia
Ireland37,082 contributions
Beautiful friezes of the eight winds on remarkable structure
Mar. 2020
It makes for a fabulous sight within the atmospheric centre of the Roman city of antiquity.

Ingeniously constructed as a weather vane and water clock around the end of the 2nd century BCE, one of its most arresting features is the sequence of friezes on each octagonal side depicting the eight winds of Greek mythology.

Each is shown personified as in their legends. Apeliotes is portrayed as a young man bearing fruit and grain. Lips holds the ornament of a ship's stern as he steers a swift voyage.

Stepping inside is to gaze at a marvellous ceiling in stone with triangular lengths culminating in the dome. On the floor is a semblance of the elaborate water clock that was intact until Ottoman times.
Written June 27, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

130Doug
Kennett Square, PA1,232 contributions
Rather empty inside, but still worth a look
Nov. 2019
November 2018 (not 2019)

So this place is considered the world's first meteorological station! I can't imagine it buried up to half its height, but it certainly made a fine bell tower and haven for whirling dervishes. Walk inside here! There isn't much to see, but it's a part of history that shouldn't be missed as long as you're walking through ancient Athens!
Written June 26, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

PaulB
Maastricht, The Netherlands2,173 contributions
Good view from outside.
Feb. 2020
The Tower of the Winds (or Horologion of Andronikos Kyrrhestes) is an octagonal Pentelic marble clocktower in the Roman Agora in Athens.
The height pf the tower is 12 m (40 Ft), the diameter is 8 m (27 Ft); It is considered the world's first meteorological station.
The tower is located within the site of the Roman Agora and can be visited in combination with the Agora.
You can also see the Tower (and Agora) clearly from the outside.
Unless you have an overall enctrance card for all sites in Athens, it's not worth to pay the entrance fee of 6 euros for adults to go in.
Written February 26, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

jordanellie41
Bolton, UK833 contributions
NOTHING INSIDE
Sep. 2019
This ancient clock tower stands at the far end of the Roman Agora and is simplistic in it's architectural design. The door is always open to view inside but there is nothing in there to see.
Written January 2, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

SoCalOregonian
Murrieta, CA9,235 contributions
HOROLOGION OF ANDRONIKOS
Dec. 2019
The “Tower of the Winds”, created by Andronikos, in the Roman Agora was erected in 2nd century BC. Built of marble, octagonal in shape and about 4 stories tall it was originally a water clock and later utilized as a church. Around the outside of the building on the frieze are the personifications of the eight main directions of the winds. The building was excavated in the early 1800’s. When we visited on 12/16 the entry door was open and we were able to enter.
Written December 28, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

jbwhitehouse
Dallas, TX1,512 contributions
Tower is within the Roman Agora
Oct. 2019
Tower of the Winds is within the Roman Agora ruins. What a fascinating round 40’ high structure that dates to about 200 BC to combine a weather vane and a water clock. Inside you can see part of the complex water pipes and round channel. Be sure to look on the outside near the roof for pictures and sculptures of different weather situations. it is a fascinating structure. Too bad signage is poor.
Written November 24, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Nonapama
Kincumber, Australia1,059 contributions
Fascinating as long as you google or get the history
Nov. 2019 • Solo
Fascinating structure dating back to 50BC or possibly earlier. The worlds first meteorological station had sundials, a water clock and wind vane. You can easily check the exterior out by walking past but pay to get inside to fully get the story. The friezes are fascinating when you read what they represent.
Written November 10, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

JLC-mtl2015
Montreal, Canada372 contributions
The Highlight of the Roman Agora
Aug. 2019
The tower is a distinctive octagonal marble structure decorated of frescos on each facade and once you realize the function of the tower, you realize how clever it is. It is not only a clock tower it is actually considered the world's first meteorological station. It’s a combination of sundials, a water clock, and a wind vane used to stand atop.

The frescos represent the direction of the wind.

You can't visit this Tower only, This is part and my favorite part of the Roman Agora.

To access the Roman Agora, you can take a combo ticket that allowed us to visit this site along with others: Ancient Agora, Hadrian’s Library, Temple of Olympian Zeus and Acropolis. If this is in your plan.

I would suggest more and better information on site on this tower.
Written November 1, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Lostagainadvisor
Houston, TX715 contributions
Octagonal tower
Sep. 2019
The tower is on the grounds of Roman Agora. It is very impressive with its reliefs and octagional shape. The original weather station.
Written October 19, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

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