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Athens Riverside: A Journey in Mythical Athens
US$49.31 per adult
Popular: Booked by 122 travellers!
Hidden Athens Small Group Walking Tour and Picnic: Plaka and the Hills of Athens
US$61.64 per adult
Popular: Booked by 1,159 travellers!
Athens Morning Electric Bike Tour
US$55.48 per adult
Popular: Booked by 157 travellers!
Electric Bike Tour of Athens by Night
US$57.94 per adult
Popular: Booked by 288 travellers!
Spend an evening like a local in Athens
US$67.81 per adult
Athens Mythological Tour: Boudoir of the Gods
US$41.92 per adult
Athens Sunset Bike Tour
US$45.00 per adult
Popular: Booked by 393 travellers!
Greek Cooking Class in Athens Including Rooftop Dinner with Acropolis View
US$98.63 per adult
Popular: Booked by 594 travellers!
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Athens 105 55 Greece
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Neos KosmosAthens Metro5 min
Syngrou FixAthens Metro7 min
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Delphi Day Trip from Athens
Day Trips

Delphi Day Trip from Athens

1,133 reviews
Take a day trip from Athens to Delphi, one of Greece’s most important archaeological sites, all without worrying about transportation or tickets. Admire the scenery en route and tour the Temple of Apollo and other relics as your guide explains the site’s significance. Then, explore Delphi Archaeological Museum to see its classical artifacts. Includes coach travel with Athens hotel (or city center) pickup and drop-off, plus an optional lunch upgrade.
US$108.49 per adult
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I W wrote a review Oct. 2020
Barrow Upon Soar, United Kingdom164 contributions48 helpful votes
We visited in October during covid. The views from here are fantastic, and it was nice to get a walk in the hills away from the hussle and bussle of the city. We actually walked around this hill and the surrounding area 3 times, during the morning, afternoon and evening. Great place for photos of the Parthenon.
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Date of experience: October 2020
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hurley_forever wrote a review Oct. 2020
Winnipeg, Canada171 contributions111 helpful votes
Great views of the city and of the Acropolis, and not difficult to get to. Just watch out for the deceptively slippery rocks.
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Date of experience: October 2020
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permia wrote a review Oct. 2020
Ireland36,845 contributions1,653 helpful votes
+1
After a fine stroll ascending it was great to arrive just as the evening light faded. Bathed in golden hues, vistas of the whole cityscape were memorable. At the apex is the fabulous Philopappos Monument, a Mausoleum created after Philopappos died in 116 CE. It is in Pentelic marble. We sat and gazed at the incomparable Acropolis. Further along is the marvellous Mount Lycabettus.
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Date of experience: March 2020
2 Helpful votes
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Tom3588 wrote a review Oct. 2020
Wokingham, United Kingdom27 contributions40 helpful votes
This little hill is really rewarding to climb with fabulous views in all directions whilst meandering around a maze of paths and the odd bit of history dotted around. Also called the hill of Muses.
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Date of experience: October 2020
1 Helpful vote
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Sherlock arting wrote a review Oct. 2020
Rome, Georgia127 contributions
+1
The Philopappos Monument is an ancient Greek mausoleum and monument dedicated to Gaius Julius Antiochus Epiphanes Philopappos or Philopappus, (65–116 AD), a prince from the Kingdom of Commagene. It is located on Mouseion Hill in Athens, Greece, southwest of the Acropolis. Philopappos’ monument is a two-story structure, supported by a base. On the lower level there is a frieze representing Philopappos as a consul, riding on a chariot and led by lictors. The upper level shows statues of three men: of Antiochus IV on the left, of Philopappos in the centre and of Seleucus I Nicator, now lost, on the right. In the niche below Philopappos is an inscription in Greek: Φιλόπαππος Επιφάνους Βησαιεύς ("Philopappos, son of Epiphanes of the deme of the Besa"). This was the name Philopappos carried as an Athenian citizen. In the niche left of Philopappos, a Latin inscription records Philopappos’ titles, honors and his career as a Roman magistrate: "Caius Iulius Antiochus Philopappos, son of Caius, of the Fabian tribe, consul and Arval brother, admitted to the praetorian rank by the emperor Caesar Nerva Trajan Optimus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus". On the right niche of Philopappos once stood a Greek inscription (now only the base is preserved): Βασιλεύς Αντίοχος Φιλόπαππος Βασιλέως Επιφανούς Αντιόχου ("King Antiochus Philopappos, son of King Antiochus Epiphanes"). Below the statue of Antiochus IV, Philopappos' paternal grandfather, is an inscription that states "King Antiochus son of King Antiochus". This inscription honors Antiochus IV and his late father, the last independent ruler of the Kingdom of Commagene, King Antiochus III Epiphanes. When Antiochus III died in 17, Commagene was annexed by the Roman Emperor Tiberius and became a part of the Roman Empire. Below the statue of Seleucus I, the founder of the Seleucid Empire from whom the Commagene kings claimed descent, stood another inscription, now lost. The traveller Cyriacus of Ancona wrote in his memoir that underneath the inscription stated "King Seleucus Nicator, son of Antiochus". The monument measures 9.80 by 9.30 metres (32.2 ft × 30.5 ft), and contains Philopappos’ burial chamber. The structure is built of white Pentelic marble on a socle 3.08 metres (10.1 ft) high, made of porous marble and veneered with slabs of Hymettian marble. The north side of Philopappos’ monument bears lavish architectural decorations
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Date of experience: September 2020
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