Mantario Trail
Mantario Trail
5
What people are saying
Brittany
By Brittany
Beautiful and Challenging Hike to Caribou Lake!
5.0 of 5 bubblesJun 2020
I hiked a portion of the Mantario Trail from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake West as an introduction to this trail. This was my first backcountry hike/camping experience with a few friends who had a lot of combined experience on this trail. We hiked approximately 20 km round trip (10 km to Caribou Lake and back) and camped in the west campground at Caribou Lake. The hike was challenging (especially while carrying the weight of extra gear for camping), but very rewarding. There were lots of ups and downs over the granite rock face, including some steep climbs and descents. The trail led through forest (including burned sections from past fires), along the granite rock face in the Canadian Shield, across a river and a couple of creeks, and over two sets of train tracks. There were some very muddy sections in the lower forest areas, more so in the first section near the beginning of the trailhead, which were sometimes tricky to maneuver and required hopping across logs. Lots of roots and rocks, so definitely watch your footing to avoid tripping. Hiking poles helped tremendously! There were beautiful views along the hike while on top of the granite rock of the surrounding forest, Caddy Lake and Whiteshell River. The trail was pretty well marked and easy to follow with arrows posted on trees and bright flagging tape. I was expecting the bugs to be much worse than they actually were. There were definitely some mosquitoes, flies and ticks but they were not horrendous. I ended up having a total of six ticks by the end of the weekend (regular ticks, no deer ticks). At the Caribou junction, the sign was down but still visible laying in front of an old airfield tower foundation in the burned section of forest. The trail to the right (marked with flagging tape), leads 5 km to the Caribou Lake east campground and the trail to the left leads 2.5 km to the west campground. If you are hiking the entire trail, then you would camp in the east campground, as this is where the trail continues from. The west campground is suited for those doing an overnight on the trail. We headed to the west campground and the trail continued along a wider grassy path through forest and over rocks. This section of the hike to Caribou Lake was less intense and it was fairly flat, with not too many ups and downs. Closer to the campground, there was a fork in the trail with an arrow pointing right and left. The right trail look lesser traveled so we took the left trail to arrive at the campground (still not sure where the other trail leads). Before arriving at the campground, we passed three bear boxes and the outdoor privy (toilet) was on the left side of the trail just before arriving to camp. Bring your own toilet paper and hand sanitizer for the toilet. Caribou Lake was absolutely gorgeous! The campground was situated on a small peninsula jutting out into the lake, among tall pine trees to provide shade. There were lots of flat spaces to pitch a tent. This was a very peaceful area, deep in the wilderness, with amazing views of the lake and so much natural, rugged beauty! There was a picnic table and fire pit at the campground as well. On the first day, it took us approximately 5.5 hours to hike the 10 km from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake, with some breaks along the way and moving at a leisurely pace. On the hike back to the trailhead, we completed the same distance in about 4.5 hours and were moving at a steadier pace with less breaks. Come prepared if you plan to hike this trail. Wear sturdy and comfortable hiking boots/shoes, bring lots of water and a water filter and extra food. There is limited cell service along most of the hike. Overall, I would absolutely recommend this hike to experienced hikers with a good fitness level looking for a challenging and rewarding experience! I definitely felt pretty strong and empowered after completing a portion of this trail. Can’t wait to eventually hike the entire 63 km.
Brittany
By Brittany
Challenging and Rewarding Hike and Backcountry Camping at Caribou Lake!
5.0 of 5 bubblesMay 2020
I hiked a portion of the Mantario Trail from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake West as an introduction to this trail. This was my first backcountry hike/camping experience with a few friends who had a lot of combined experience on this trail. We hiked approximately 20 km round trip (10 km to Caribou Lake and back) and camped in the west campground at Caribou Lake. The hike was challenging (especially while carrying the weight of extra gear for camping), but very rewarding. There were lots of ups and downs over the granite rock face, including some steep climbs and descents. The trail led through forest (including burned sections from past fires), along the granite rock face in the Canadian Shield, across a river and a couple of creeks, and over two sets of train tracks. There were some very muddy sections in the lower forest areas, more so in the first section near the beginning of the trailhead, which were sometimes tricky to maneuver and required hopping across logs. Lots of roots and rocks, so definitely watch your footing to avoid tripping. Hiking poles helped tremendously! There were beautiful views along the hike while on top of the granite rock of the surrounding forest, Caddy Lake and Whiteshell River. The trail was pretty well marked and easy to follow with arrows posted on trees and bright flagging tape. I was expecting the bugs to be much worse than they actually were. There were definitely some mosquitoes, flies and ticks but they were not horrendous. I ended up having a total of six ticks by the end of the weekend (regular ticks, no deer ticks). At the Caribou junction, the sign was down but still visible laying in front of an old airfield tower foundation in the burned section of forest. The trail to the right (marked with flagging tape), leads 5 km to the Caribou Lake east campground and the trail to the left leads 2.5 km to the west campground. If you are hiking the entire trail, then you would camp in the east campground, as this is where the trail continues from. The west campground is suited for those doing an overnight on the trail. We headed to the west campground and the trail continued along a wider grassy path through forest and over rocks. This section of the hike to Caribou Lake was less intense and it was fairly flat, with not too many ups and downs. Closer to the campground, there was a fork in the trail with an arrow pointing right and left. The right trail look lesser traveled so we took the left trail to arrive at the campground (still not sure where the other trail leads). Before arriving at the campground, we passed three bear boxes and the outdoor privy (toilet) was on the left side of the trail just before arriving to camp. Bring your own toilet paper and hand sanitizer for the toilet. Caribou Lake was absolutely gorgeous! The campground was situated on a small peninsula jutting out into the lake, among tall pine trees to provide shade. There were lots of flat spaces to pitch a tent. This was a very peaceful area, deep in the wilderness, with amazing views of the lake and so much natural, rugged beauty! There was a picnic table and fire pit at the campground as well. On the first day, it took us approximately 5.5 hours to hike the 10 km from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake, with some breaks along the way and moving at a leisurely pace. On the hike back to the trailhead, we completed the same distance in about 4.5 hours and were moving at a steadier pace with less breaks. Come prepared if you plan to hike this trail. Wear sturdy and comfortable hiking boots/shoes, bring lots of water and a water filter and extra food. There is limited cell service along most of the hike. Overall, I would absolutely recommend this hike to experienced hikers with a good fitness level looking for a challenging and rewarding experience! I definitely felt pretty strong and empowered after completing a portion of this trail. Can’t wait to eventually hike the entire 63 km.

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Brittany
Winnipeg, Canada3,237 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2020 • Friends
I hiked a portion of the Mantario Trail from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake West as an introduction to this trail. This was my first backcountry hike/camping experience with a few friends who had a lot of combined experience on this trail.

We hiked approximately 20 km round trip (10 km to Caribou Lake and back) and camped in the west campground at Caribou Lake. The hike was challenging (especially while carrying the weight of extra gear for camping), but very rewarding. There were lots of ups and downs over the granite rock face, including some steep climbs and descents. The trail led through forest (including burned sections from past fires), along the granite rock face in the Canadian Shield, across a river and a couple of creeks, and over two sets of train tracks. There were some very muddy sections in the lower forest areas, more so in the first section near the beginning of the trailhead, which were sometimes tricky to maneuver and required hopping across logs. Lots of roots and rocks, so definitely watch your footing to avoid tripping. Hiking poles helped tremendously! There were beautiful views along the hike while on top of the granite rock of the surrounding forest, Caddy Lake and Whiteshell River. The trail was pretty well marked and easy to follow with arrows posted on trees and bright flagging tape.

I was expecting the bugs to be much worse than they actually were. There were definitely some mosquitoes, flies and ticks but they were not horrendous. I ended up having a total of six ticks by the end of the weekend (regular ticks, no deer ticks).

At the Caribou junction, the sign was down but still visible laying in front of an old airfield tower foundation in the burned section of forest. The trail to the right (marked with flagging tape), leads 5 km to the Caribou Lake east campground and the trail to the left leads 2.5 km to the west campground. If you are hiking the entire trail, then you would camp in the east campground, as this is where the trail continues from. The west campground is suited for those doing an overnight on the trail. We headed to the west campground and the trail continued along a wider grassy path through forest and over rocks. This section of the hike to Caribou Lake was less intense and it was fairly flat, with not too many ups and downs. Closer to the campground, there was a fork in the trail with an arrow pointing right and left. The right trail look lesser traveled so we took the left trail to arrive at the campground (still not sure where the other trail leads). Before arriving at the campground, we passed three bear boxes and the outdoor privy (toilet) was on the left side of the trail just before arriving to camp. Bring your own toilet paper and hand sanitizer for the toilet.

Caribou Lake was absolutely gorgeous! The campground was situated on a small peninsula jutting out into the lake, among tall pine trees to provide shade. There were lots of flat spaces to pitch a tent. This was a very peaceful area, deep in the wilderness, with amazing views of the lake and so much natural, rugged beauty! There was a picnic table and fire pit at the campground as well.

On the first day, it took us approximately 5.5 hours to hike the 10 km from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake, with some breaks along the way and moving at a leisurely pace. On the hike back to the trailhead, we completed the same distance in about 4.5 hours and were moving at a steadier pace with less breaks. Come prepared if you plan to hike this trail. Wear sturdy and comfortable hiking boots/shoes, bring lots of water and a water filter and extra food. There is limited cell service along most of the hike.

Overall, I would absolutely recommend this hike to experienced hikers with a good fitness level looking for a challenging and rewarding experience! I definitely felt pretty strong and empowered after completing a portion of this trail. Can’t wait to eventually hike the entire 63 km.
Written June 13, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brittany
Winnipeg, Canada3,237 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2020
I hiked a portion of the Mantario Trail from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake West as an introduction to this trail. This was my first backcountry hike/camping experience with a few friends who had a lot of combined experience on this trail.

We hiked approximately 20 km round trip (10 km to Caribou Lake and back) and camped in the west campground at Caribou Lake. The hike was challenging (especially while carrying the weight of extra gear for camping), but very rewarding. There were lots of ups and downs over the granite rock face, including some steep climbs and descents. The trail led through forest (including burned sections from past fires), along the granite rock face in the Canadian Shield, across a river and a couple of creeks, and over two sets of train tracks. There were some very muddy sections in the lower forest areas, more so in the first section near the beginning of the trailhead, which were sometimes tricky to maneuver and required hopping across logs. Lots of roots and rocks, so definitely watch your footing to avoid tripping. Hiking poles helped tremendously! There were beautiful views along the hike while on top of the granite rock of the surrounding forest, Caddy Lake and Whiteshell River. The trail was pretty well marked and easy to follow with arrows posted on trees and bright flagging tape.

I was expecting the bugs to be much worse than they actually were. There were definitely some mosquitoes, flies and ticks but they were not horrendous. I ended up having a total of six ticks by the end of the weekend (regular ticks, no deer ticks).

At the Caribou junction, the sign was down but still visible laying in front of an old airfield tower foundation in the burned section of forest. The trail to the right (marked with flagging tape), leads 5 km to the Caribou Lake east campground and the trail to the left leads 2.5 km to the west campground. If you are hiking the entire trail, then you would camp in the east campground, as this is where the trail continues from. The west campground is suited for those doing an overnight on the trail. We headed to the west campground and the trail continued along a wider grassy path through forest and over rocks. This section of the hike to Caribou Lake was less intense and it was fairly flat, with not too many ups and downs. Closer to the campground, there was a fork in the trail with an arrow pointing right and left. The right trail look lesser traveled so we took the left trail to arrive at the campground (still not sure where the other trail leads). Before arriving at the campground, we passed three bear boxes and the outdoor privy (toilet) was on the left side of the trail just before arriving to camp. Bring your own toilet paper and hand sanitizer for the toilet.

Caribou Lake was absolutely gorgeous! The campground was situated on a small peninsula jutting out into the lake, among tall pine trees to provide shade. There were lots of flat spaces to pitch a tent. This was a very peaceful area, deep in the wilderness, with amazing views of the lake and so much natural, rugged beauty! There was a picnic table and fire pit at the campground as well.

On the first day, it took us approximately 5.5 hours to hike the 10 km from the south trailhead to Caribou Lake, with some breaks along the way and moving at a leisurely pace. On the hike back to the trailhead, we completed the same distance in about 4.5 hours and were moving at a steadier pace with less breaks. Come prepared if you plan to hike this trail. Wear sturdy and comfortable hiking boots/shoes, bring lots of water and a water filter and extra food. There is limited cell service along most of the hike.

Overall, I would absolutely recommend this hike to experienced hikers with a good fitness level looking for a challenging and rewarding experience! I definitely felt pretty strong and empowered after completing a portion of this trail. Can’t wait to eventually hike the entire 63 km.
Written June 1, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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