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Cascada Los Azules

17 Reviews

Cascada Los Azules

17 Reviews
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Full-Day Tequila Tour from Guadalajara
Wine Tasting & Winery Tours

Full-Day Tequila Tour from Guadalajara

49 reviews
If you're curious to learn more about tequila, Mexico is truly the best place in the world to experience this distinctive liquor. Enjoy a singular tequila experience with this tasting tour from Guadalajara, where you not only sample this tasty Mexican product, but visit distilleries along the way. Highlights include exploring the village of Tequila, seeing actual agave fields, and satisfying your palate with an included distillery tasting.
US$66.00 per adult
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Writer_M_Ryan wrote a review Sep. 2019
Guadalajara, Mexico10 contributions3 helpful votes
I can't express how magical this place is....but it's wonderful. There are several pools and falls to visit and it's easily an all day event (although you can do a morning to early afternoon hike in and hike out). The hike isn't easy, you must have good shoes and be in reasonably good shape. The trip down is 45 minutes to an hour, depending on which pool and how fast you go, coming back out is tough, it's a huge elevation change. Take lots of water and snacks, there's nothing there but nature. The trails are reasonably well marked, if you go downward, you'll end up somewhere on the stream and if you upward you'll eventually hit the trail head. Keep in mind that you have to park on a dirt road in an agave field at the top of the valley, so don't have valuables in the car. You can also park in the last neighborhood road before the trail head and depending on the day and time you might find a resident willing to keep an eye on your car. It's a great trip and I highly recommend making a day of it. Oh, while I haven't used them, there is a tour that takes people and you can belay down the middle falls, about 60 meters or so, I'm told.
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Date of experience: March 2019
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Pilar wrote a review May 2019
10 contributions2 helpful votes
The waterfalls are amazing, unfortunately they have a lot of pipes at the top to get water to houses nearby and its not very clean. The trail to get there is steep so I would not recommend it for little kids
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Date of experience: May 2019
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TineMatthys wrote a review Mar. 2019
Playa del Carmen, Mexico33 contributions12 helpful votes
I tried to find the waterfalls with maps.me but the app did not take me to the right spots. It is dangerous to go without a guide and easy to get lost and never find the waterfalls. I just asked a local kid passing by to show me and paid 50 pesos as a tip. It was great.
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Date of experience: March 2019
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Manuel O wrote a review Oct. 2017
Mexico City, Mexico29 contributions6 helpful votes
My wife and I adventured going by ourselves, it’s a 25 minute walk from downtown Tequila to where the trails begin. I would recommend bringing cross country tennis shoes with good traction as the trails are very steep and many loose rocks. Also, try to follow the red dots painted on rocks and trees once you enter the trail, as they will lead you through the worthy paths (we didn’t and wasted valuable time and energy). We would also recommend to arrive as early as possible if you’re going by yourself. Besides that, it’s a nice place to visit, absolutely recommend it.
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Date of experience: October 2017
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John P wrote a review May 2017
Guadalajara, Mexico338 contributions140 helpful votes
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The town of Tequila is famous for its distilleries but I predict it may someday become a Mecca for nature lovers and outdoor adventurers, simply because it sits right between two of Jalisco’s most attractive natural wonders: Tequila Volcano and La Toma Canyon. The volcano rises to a height of 2920 meters and has a timberline climate at the top all year round while the canyon, 2000 meters below, is eternally hot, steamy and filled with lush jungle growth and tropical fruits like sapotes and chirimoyas. While everyone knows the volcano is located just south of Tequila, hardly anyone is aware that homes at the northeastern edge of the town are perched upon the very edge of a sheer cliff overlooking La Toma Valley. Even fewer people know that a short hike along a trail down the barranca wall will bring you to one of the most beautiful waterfalls in what I have described as The Magic Circle of fascinating outdoor sites within easy reach of Guadalajara. This waterfall is called Los Azules and for 20 years I searched for an easy way to reach it. Then I bumped into ecotourism guide Luis Medina. “John, that waterfall you’ve been calling ‘elusive’ is only a half-hour walk from Tequila—and, guess what, it’s not one waterfall but three biggies. I’ll show you the trail this coming Friday.” A few days later, Luis and his wife Lucy picked up Susy and me and off we drove to Tequila. We parked only one kilometer from the highway and began walking through gorgeous fields of blue-green agaves, along a road dotted with chunks of high-quality black obsidian. The fact that there was so much obsidian spread over such a large area surprised us—and, we later learned, also surprised archeologist Phil Weigand who told us this particular obsidian deposit has never been registered. At the end of the road we had been following, we started down a narrow, steep trail surrounded by jungly growth. Suddenly we came to a clearing and there, far below us in all its splendor, lay the huge valley of La Toma, framed by high, red canyon walls. “Welcome to the Machu Pichu of Guadalajara,” announced Luis. Fifteen minutes later, we arrived at the kind of waterfall I would expect to find in the Garden of Eden. It was 40 meters tall, wide and wispy, with a sunlit blue-green pool at its foot that beckoned us to jump right in for a swim—which, of course, we wasted no time in doing. The water, by the way, comes from springs near the top of the canyon and is perfectly clean. To our surprise, the pool temperature was neither hot nor cold, but pleasantly cool. As we swam and played in the water, dozens of blue and red dragonflies danced in the air above us, exactly like the birds and butterflies in a Walt Disney movie. In fact, the whole scene was more like a dream than reality and to top it off, we had this paradise all to ourselves the whole time we were there, which was most of the day. “Luis,” I said, “this is heaven! In the USA, this would be a National Park with No-Swimming signs and hundreds of tourists filing by just to get a glimpse of it.” Luis mentioned that the flow of water in Los Azules is more or less the same all year round and also during storms. This means you don’t have to worry about flash floods in this canyon, as you must in many others. The directions below will lead you to waterfall number two, which is very attractive and easy to reach. There are, of course, a grand total of three, which explains why the name of the place is Los Azules and not El Azul. The first fall is around 60 meters high but only operates right after a storm while the third is 70 meters tall and, like the second, runs all year round. If you’d like to have Los Azules all to yourself, visit this site on a workday, not on the weekend (especially Sunday), when a lot of people from Tequila hike down for a swim. Don’t forget your swimsuit and a camera! How to get there Take Libre (free) Highway 15 west from Guadalajara. Upon arriving at Tequila, watch for the traffic island with a large sculpture honoring Tequila making. 683 meters past the sculpture you’ll come to a cemetery. Turn right here onto La Paz Street and go to the end of it (a T). Turn left, drive 940 meters northeast and park (N20 53.563 W103 49.627). Continue along this same road, but on foot, for 902 meters at which point you’ll cross a dry riverbed. Now you are no longer on a road, but on a trail. Follow this downhill for about 160 meters to a Y (N20 53.874 W103 49.206). Take the left fork downwards another 150 meters to a T (approximately N20 53.895 W103 49.270). The trail to your left goes to the base of Waterfall 1 which is dry most of the year. The trail to your right takes you 240 meters to the glorious blue pool at the bottom of waterfall 2 (approximately N20 53.932 W103 49.261). The hike from your car to this pool is about 30 minutes and the drive from Guadalajara to the parking spot is about one hour.
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Date of experience: February 2017
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