Art Galleries in Vancouver

THE 10 BEST Vancouver Art Galleries

Art Galleries in Vancouver

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What travellers are saying

  • Unelma333
    Karlsruhe, Germany1,217 contributions
    The museum is quite far from the central parts of Vancouver, so you either need a car or take the bus to the university campus. But if you have the slightest interest in the culture of First Nations, it is absolutely worth it.
    They have fascinating exhibits, including totem poles and different artefacts. There is plenty of information provided in order to understand the history and cultural significance behind each item. The Bill Reid rotunda is impressive and showcases the work of this well-known Haida artist.
    There is also a colourful selection of cultural exhibits from all over the world, which were interesting to see as well. The only part I skipped was European ceramics. I'm sure that is interesting as well, though a bit less if you come from Europe.
    The gift shop was excellent, too, and a good source of souvenirs if you want to make sure that the artists who created them were treated fairly.
    Written November 17, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • MDJ334
    Minneapolis, MN93 contributions
    This gallery was on my list of things to visit, we walked by it and I said I need to see this. The architecture is stunning, as well as the way items are exhibited. It was an engaging collection.
    We both thoroughly enjoyed it.
    Written September 14, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • julijoyeux
    Bordeaux, France149 contributions
    This is a smaller fine art museum which seems to have more temporary than permanent displays. I enjoyed several individual installations very much. However, I was disappointed that our visit was limited to 1 hour because of a wedding set-up. When I booked the online tickets, there was no indication of a private party taking over the space and I feel like we were cheated out of a better, longer, and more immersive visit...which it certainly deserves.
    Written October 7, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • RoadDolphin
    Shediac, Canada41 contributions
    Recently moved from Gastown, but very accessible by public transit. Lots of beautiful art pieces, and also other Indigenous-made goods such as jewelry and wallets. Relaxing to browse the gallery. Knowledgable and friendly staff. Definitely worth a visit.
    Written June 5, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • JeannetteMcF
    Auckland, New Zealand89 contributions
    This gallery is just across the street from the steam clock. It’s a touristy area but the standard of the work is very fine. I went in specifically looking for silver jewellery by native artists. The selection was small but beautiful quality. I ended up buying a carved silver bracelet by a Coast Salish artist, which was different from anything else I had seen in Vancouver or in Alaska. I only checked out the prices for jewellery but they were comparable with other shops including the gift shop of the Anchorage Museum. The staff were helpful and not pushy.
    Written September 24, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Susanna S.
    Vancouver, Canada7 contributions
    The gallery moved back to Vancouver Downtown. It has opened a new location at Canada Place, inside the Pan Pacific Hotel, on the reception level This is the same level where the restaurant and lounge are.
    Written May 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chris D
    New Westminster, Canada3,046 contributions
    There are a lot of art galleries in Vancouver. There are a lot of GOOD art galleries in Vancouver. But, there are very few like this one, which specializes in local's woodwork, stone sculpture, and other media. The photos help show the quality and selection that is difficult to put into words. Tourists who are interested in local culture should definitely look here; in the western part of Gastown, a short walk from the Cruise Ship Centre.
    Written January 17, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Beckie D
    125 contributions
    This wad a destination gallery for us, in the touristy area of Granville island. The artwork was incredible with a wide range of media and knowledgeable staff. Well worth a visit.
    Written October 2, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Y C
    Vancouver, Canada1,444 contributions
    I'm quite surprised I've reviewed this brewery before since it is one of my favorites. As I said before, typically, one doesn't like absolutely all of the beers a brewery has to offer. Same here, I can't say that I love absolutely all of their brews, however, all they have to offer is a very good product overall. And, of course, few beers are absolutely exceptional! Great rotation of seasonal brews as well. Not always, but very often there is a food truck outside, so as some specials available inside of the brewery. Lovely interior, great staff, and continuously good beers. A must-visit location for sure!
    Written August 6, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Cristina P
    Valencia, Spain44 contributions
    If you are not an expert in modern art maybe you don’t visit the museum however it’s a good plan in a raining day.
    It was my pleasure to enjoy the exposition of Japanese Murakami - The octopus eats its own leg spending there a great couple of hours.
    Written July 18, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • John M
    New Port Richey, FL740 contributions
    The Ukama Gallery was a treat. It held the works of Candian contemporary artists' work as well as a focus on Zimbabwe sculptors. The sculptures were intriguing. Our reception at the gallery was professional, and everyone working there was very pleasant. This is a don't miss place.
    Written January 26, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada13,343 contributions
    I was a little bemused to see the Vancouver Biennale listed as a “thing to do” on TripAdvisor. My befuddlement stems from three points: 1) The Biennale is an organization that promotes and exhibits art in public spaces. They hold a physical office in Vancouver, though I doubt it’s on most peoples’ itineraries; 2) All of the current Biennale-sponsored public art pieces have their own listings on TripAdvisor; and, 3) The TripAdvisor listing for this page speaks specifically to the Ocean Concrete Silos “GIANTS” at Granville Island, which already has its own TripAdvisor page (“Granville Giants Murals”). I realize point #3 is probably just somebody’s silly error, but it does make “Vancouver Biennale” potentially confusing for some. Nevertheless, I’ll take this as an opportunity to talk about the Biennale and its importance in shaping the character of this city. In doing so, I’ll likely mention some of the Biennale’s installations in passing. If you’d like more substantive reviews of individual Biennale public art pieces, please see my separate entries for each on this site.

    Established in 2002, the Vancouver Biennale has as its Mission “exhibit[ing] great art in public space, creating a catalyst for learning, community engagement, dialogue, and social action.” In short, the Biennale – through its public art exhibits – hopes to engage the community and encourage us to think while concomitantly enjoying the art before us. In this way, art isn’t just a beautiful plaything for us to admire; instead, it becomes a space within which we can ponder deep cultural questions and maybe – just maybe – be spurred into action. Consider Jianhua’s “Pillows” from the 2009-2011 Biennale: A series of fibreglass “pillows,” the artist upsets and de-constructs the meaning of “pillow” from soft, warm and welcoming to a cold, hard and impersonal object. In doing so, Jianhua encourages us to more closely examine “the everyday” for new meanings and insights. “Pillows” was a quirky installation at Harbour Green Park, but it captured the essence of the Vancouver Biennale quite aptly.

    Because the Biennale only uses public space for its exhibits, the artwork is accessible to most anybody. Vancouver is thus transformed into an “Open Air Museum” which, in turn, morphs the city into a massive canvas of sorts where we can all come together and explore, create an inter-communal dialogue, and learn from one another. There are no boundaries; we can use our imaginations and make of the art what we want. “Echoes” at Kits Beach, for example, can simply be a comfortable set of chairs, or they can be modes through which we can communicate and question language constructs. Now that’s deep!

    What I appreciate about the Vancouver Biennale, beyond its (mostly) interesting installations across the city, is the indirect way it encourages us to explore our City of Glass. When I decided to do a “Biennale Walk” of sorts, I started at Point Grey – one of Vancouver’s most affluent neighbourhoods – to view “Vancouver Novel.” Set within the context of a posh neighbourhood, the scrolling text is at once humorous and unsettling. You almost feel like a voyeur standing in front of someone’s private home. From Point Grey, I made my way to Kits Beach (home of “Echoes”) and wandered along the Seawall until I came upon Granville Island (“Giants” and “The Family”). After exploring bustling Granville Island, I continued along the Seawall until I reached Cambie Bridge. Here is where you’ll find the Biennale’s latest installation, “Voxel Bridge,” which combines the physical and digital worlds in a beautiful gestalt. “Vortex” is at nearby Hinge Park, but is a waste of time, in my view. Following an insightful and mind-blowing experience at “Voxel Bridge,” I exited the Seawall and made my way towards the Vancouver Biennale office where I could observe “The STOP.” This piece, which was part of the 2009-2011 Biennale, is an excellent example of why context is important. The STOP was originally installed at Charleson Park and Vanier Park – unsettling and disturbing viewers because of its apparent randomness – but now resides next to the Vancouver Biennale offices, in a small industrial area. In my view, The STOP loses much of its impact because, 1) It’s not in a very high-traffic area; 2) The signs are spaced differently and at least one is somewhat askew; and, 3) The pink colour opposite the word STOP is likely to be missed unless one walks into the small parking lot adjacent the office building . . . okay, I’m rambling. Long story short: The Biennale provided an opportunity to actively explore and engage the city in a unique way – through art and culture.

    The Biennale’s current theme, “re-IMAGE-n,” is timely given our existing milieu. There can be no doubt that the ongoing COVID pandemic has opened serious social cleavages and raised many important questions as a result. Toni Latour’s simple neon sign – “let’s heal the divide” – brings this to our attention and asks us to re-evaluate our attitudes in this time and this place. Likewise, the pandemic has also shifted what “public space” means. Most of us moved online to communicate, work and foster a sense of community; thus, the virtual world becomes our new public space. That’s why installations like Jessica Angel’s “Voxel Bridge” are so important – they point towards new technologies we might use for practical and, indeed, fun purposes. In brief, the current installations push progressivism within an artistic/cultural framework.

    I should note, by way of conclusion, that most works that’re part of the Biennale are typically on exhibit for a period of 2 years. After that, they’re taken down UNLESS somebody generously purchases them and donates back to the city. They then become “legacy” pieces – examples include A-maze-ing Laughter, GIANTS, The Family and Jasper. In brief, some exhibits are time-limited so be sure to see them while you can!

    PS: It’s a shame Chen Wenling’s “Boy Holding a Shark” ended up in purgatory even before installation (nixed?). I would’ve much preferred this piece over his ugly “Proud Youth,” which currently sits along the Seawall near Yaletown.
    Written March 21, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dziran
    Los Angeles577 contributions
    This gallery was the best thing I visited on Granville Island. Her photography is excellent and showcases the natural beauty of British Columbia. On a rainy day I didn't risk buying a print but will order one in the future.
    Written September 16, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • McWett
    Las Vegas, NV1,492 contributions
    With all,of the food vendors in the market you might miss this little bit,of Granville Island.

    Nice selection of works by local artists to see and buy.
    Written September 16, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Shannon K
    1 contribution
    I have purchased high quality paintings here for reasonable process. I recommend attending, sharing on social media (promoting) and investing in local Canadian Art. It is of the highest quality and from the purest of heart. These artists are so proud of Canada and it shows in their work. An excellent place to buy art.
    Written October 2, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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