Top Things to Do in Mount Pleasant

THE 10 BEST Things to Do in Mount Pleasant, Vancouver

Top Things to Do in Mount Pleasant

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  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
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What travellers are saying

  • on_the_go_98765
    Tucson20,631 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This end of Vancouver is probably where I would want to live, if I lived here. It just seemed less congested, had nice parks, was serviced by mass transit, and just looked so clean and pleasant.

    We took the False Creek Ferry here to the Science World stop and got out to look for anything remaining of the Olympics. But, after the Olympics, the area went through a massive redevelopment and all the temporary Olympics events and places were dismantled. Progress stops for no one.

    Things get really crowded and hectic around Granville Island and it was so refreshing to find some peacefulness out this way.
    Written February 7, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Neil B
    Auckland, New Zealand1,436 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Second stop on our Mt Pleasant self-guided brewery tour. Most convivial. Wide range of good beers. Cider available in cans. Very friendly staff.
    Written December 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Neil B
    Auckland, New Zealand1,436 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Third stop on our Mt Pleasant self-guided brewery tour. Beautiful old building, good beer, friendly and obliging staff.
    Written December 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chris D
    New Westminster, Canada3,216 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The City of Vancouver can hardly be considered as one big homogeneous place, especially when one visits great neighbourhoods like Commercial Drive, or this one.
    While bounded by Cambie, Clark, 2nd, and King Ed, the heart has to be Main Street running south from Broadway. I found Red Cat Records (vinyl galore!) Vietnamese restaurants, pocket parks, and a poodle statue (really!). I'm getting to be of an age to be unable to report on the nightlife, but saw signs that the night before must have been fun for some. I enjoyed the walk through the past, and hope you do too!
    Written June 20, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada14,274 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I was a little bemused to see the Vancouver Biennale listed as a “thing to do” on TripAdvisor. My befuddlement stems from three points: 1) The Biennale is an organization that promotes and exhibits art in public spaces. They hold a physical office in Vancouver, though I doubt it’s on most peoples’ itineraries; 2) All of the current Biennale-sponsored public art pieces have their own listings on TripAdvisor; and, 3) The TripAdvisor listing for this page speaks specifically to the Ocean Concrete Silos “GIANTS” at Granville Island, which already has its own TripAdvisor page (“Granville Giants Murals”). I realize point #3 is probably just somebody’s silly error, but it does make “Vancouver Biennale” potentially confusing for some. Nevertheless, I’ll take this as an opportunity to talk about the Biennale and its importance in shaping the character of this city. In doing so, I’ll likely mention some of the Biennale’s installations in passing. If you’d like more substantive reviews of individual Biennale public art pieces, please see my separate entries for each on this site.

    Established in 2002, the Vancouver Biennale has as its Mission “exhibit[ing] great art in public space, creating a catalyst for learning, community engagement, dialogue, and social action.” In short, the Biennale – through its public art exhibits – hopes to engage the community and encourage us to think while concomitantly enjoying the art before us. In this way, art isn’t just a beautiful plaything for us to admire; instead, it becomes a space within which we can ponder deep cultural questions and maybe – just maybe – be spurred into action. Consider Jianhua’s “Pillows” from the 2009-2011 Biennale: A series of fibreglass “pillows,” the artist upsets and de-constructs the meaning of “pillow” from soft, warm and welcoming to a cold, hard and impersonal object. In doing so, Jianhua encourages us to more closely examine “the everyday” for new meanings and insights. “Pillows” was a quirky installation at Harbour Green Park, but it captured the essence of the Vancouver Biennale quite aptly.

    Because the Biennale only uses public space for its exhibits, the artwork is accessible to most anybody. Vancouver is thus transformed into an “Open Air Museum” which, in turn, morphs the city into a massive canvas of sorts where we can all come together and explore, create an inter-communal dialogue, and learn from one another. There are no boundaries; we can use our imaginations and make of the art what we want. “Echoes” at Kits Beach, for example, can simply be a comfortable set of chairs, or they can be modes through which we can communicate and question language constructs. Now that’s deep!

    What I appreciate about the Vancouver Biennale, beyond its (mostly) interesting installations across the city, is the indirect way it encourages us to explore our City of Glass. When I decided to do a “Biennale Walk” of sorts, I started at Point Grey – one of Vancouver’s most affluent neighbourhoods – to view “Vancouver Novel.” Set within the context of a posh neighbourhood, the scrolling text is at once humorous and unsettling. You almost feel like a voyeur standing in front of someone’s private home. From Point Grey, I made my way to Kits Beach (home of “Echoes”) and wandered along the Seawall until I came upon Granville Island (“Giants” and “The Family”). After exploring bustling Granville Island, I continued along the Seawall until I reached Cambie Bridge. Here is where you’ll find the Biennale’s latest installation, “Voxel Bridge,” which combines the physical and digital worlds in a beautiful gestalt. “Vortex” is at nearby Hinge Park, but is a waste of time, in my view. Following an insightful and mind-blowing experience at “Voxel Bridge,” I exited the Seawall and made my way towards the Vancouver Biennale office where I could observe “The STOP.” This piece, which was part of the 2009-2011 Biennale, is an excellent example of why context is important. The STOP was originally installed at Charleson Park and Vanier Park – unsettling and disturbing viewers because of its apparent randomness – but now resides next to the Vancouver Biennale offices, in a small industrial area. In my view, The STOP loses much of its impact because, 1) It’s not in a very high-traffic area; 2) The signs are spaced differently and at least one is somewhat askew; and, 3) The pink colour opposite the word STOP is likely to be missed unless one walks into the small parking lot adjacent the office building . . . okay, I’m rambling. Long story short: The Biennale provided an opportunity to actively explore and engage the city in a unique way – through art and culture.

    The Biennale’s current theme, “re-IMAGE-n,” is timely given our existing milieu. There can be no doubt that the ongoing COVID pandemic has opened serious social cleavages and raised many important questions as a result. Toni Latour’s simple neon sign – “let’s heal the divide” – brings this to our attention and asks us to re-evaluate our attitudes in this time and this place. Likewise, the pandemic has also shifted what “public space” means. Most of us moved online to communicate, work and foster a sense of community; thus, the virtual world becomes our new public space. That’s why installations like Jessica Angel’s “Voxel Bridge” are so important – they point towards new technologies we might use for practical and, indeed, fun purposes. In brief, the current installations push progressivism within an artistic/cultural framework.

    I should note, by way of conclusion, that most works that’re part of the Biennale are typically on exhibit for a period of 2 years. After that, they’re taken down UNLESS somebody generously purchases them and donates back to the city. They then become “legacy” pieces – examples include A-maze-ing Laughter, GIANTS, The Family and Jasper. In brief, some exhibits are time-limited so be sure to see them while you can!

    PS: It’s a shame Chen Wenling’s “Boy Holding a Shark” ended up in purgatory even before installation (nixed?). I would’ve much preferred this piece over his ugly “Proud Youth,” which currently sits along the Seawall near Yaletown.
    Written March 21, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sarah C
    Ashtead, UK1,260 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Gosh this is a dramatic and stand-out building - art deco style and bold as anything, a real landmark. We wandered around the outside / garden area as part of a long self led city walk
    Written May 16, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • asklepios
    New York City, NY15 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Vancouver Bach Choir (VBC) is actually a family of choirs - check out their web site. The so-called symphonic choir is a very high level, annually auditioned community choir that may be described as 'semi-professional'. A large number of the members are professional musicians. Typically they perform with a professional orchestra, such as the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra (VSO); or else with semi-professional orchestras such as the West Coast Symphony.

    Programming is quite varied, from Baroque to Modern. For instance, the 22-23 season program has included Messiah (Handel), Carmina Burana (Orff), Missa Solemnis (Beethoven), Symphony of Psalms (Stravinsky) and Tubular Bells (Mike Oldfield).
    Written March 19, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chris D
    New Westminster, Canada3,216 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    With all the activity in this area, surprising there have been no reviews for two years. Also surprising that its been two years since I've enjoyed this area - must be Covid,
    In any event, while I doubt many tourists would make a special trip to see this interesting but specialized art, it helps to think of this as a break along the vast array of sights that is South False Creek - a seawall stretching from Science World, not far away at the extreme east end of the creek, to Kitsilano and beyond. There is a large square suitable for having a snack or beverage from one of the many establishments in the area, and some great photo ops to the north.
    Written September 3, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Moniaits
    London, UK1,650 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Good food, good beer, good service. The lamb shank was excellent and so was the IPA. Good quality burgers.
    Written January 28, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tyler g
    3 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Awesome brewery great vibes and really good beer, such a fun place! My favorite in all of Vancouver!
    Written July 4, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Dravie B
    Vancouver, Canada4 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Went to a christmas show here during week day and liked the facility for the play we saw. Adequate sized venue with all seats giving good view of stage. Harder parking around here so take Evo or bus if you can.
    Written January 17, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Steve N
    New Westminster, Canada251 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    VR = Very Rad!
    Especially so when it's the world's most advanced Free Roam Virtual Reality experience at the aptly named Zero Latency! Having only heard of VR till date and never having tried it, I was really excited to give this a shot with my Elite squad.

    Parking at Kingsgate Mall was a breeze, and Zero Latency was right at the entrance of the complex. Even though I was a bit late in joining, Game Master James and Carlin were very patient and kind, and quickly took me through the process and provided the relevant instructions. Fully geared up with a vest, 4k headset, gun and what not, I soon joined my crew of Black Ops specialists aboard a secret military space station ready to take on rogue drones and bots! Singularity, ahoy!

    For the next half an hour, our crew of eight was transported to a space station where we worked together to destroy the killer A. I. before it eliminated us. The graphics were amazing, the movements realistic and trippy, the feedback instantaneous when getting close to a teammate or a wall, and best was the fun in the team work, coordinating and joking with one another over the mic while we slayed our intergalactic foe! Oh yeah, mission accomplished! To say that the experience was immersive and cathartic (blasting evil to smithereens FTW!) would be an understatement. Not since my college days over a decade ago when I used to play soccer/ Quake3/ Counter Strike have I had so much fun in a team activity!

    I was left sweating profusely with a racing heart, a big smile and a desire for more action at the end of this intense workout! Hey, it's no joke to cover 200m on a claustrophobic spaceship when carrying a heavy gun and armor while wearing warm winter clothes under a spacesuit! *panting* Game Master James ensured a smooth transition of the team back to planet earth as he debriefed us while neatly stowing away our gear. Getting to see our team score on the screen was cool, as was receiving it in the email that we had entered when signing the waiver at the start of the event. The folks at Zero Latency clicked some really cool pictures and videos of our group as we fought our way through the sci-fi thriller, and after we survived the ordeal!

    Thank you to the Zero Latency team and my squad for this rejuvenating and thrilling experience that doubled as a fantastic birthday present for me. Can't wait to be back here to escape even if briefly from the real world into this alternate reality. For now, opening a can of chilled beer to cool off and celebrate the win!
    Written October 28, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Dan H
    Toronto, Canada78 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The gallery has been around for about 2 years, but I just found it. So glad I did. It's a bit out of the way, but well worth the visit. High quality North west coast art. I will visit it whenever I'm in Vancouver. If you love NWC art, you won't be disappointed.
    Written March 17, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chris D
    New Westminster, Canada3,216 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    My first impression, as I walked into the parking lot, was "what a dump". But, like an iceberg, I began to realize there was more to this mall than the drab facade.
    Once inside, it is clean, active, and surprisingly busy. However, as someone who knows a bit about commercial real estate, I was surprised how dated this place looked. If the producers of the movie "Grease" wanted to do a sequel, they might consider this for some scenes. Seriously!
    I suggest this is too big for a neighbourhood/local mall, but too small to be considered an area mall, like Oakridge, say. It has four clothing stores, a food store, drug store, liquor store, and many services, including a tailor. They have lots of parking and clean washrooms.
    I hadn't originally considered this a tourist destination, but after spending a while here, and reviewing my photos, I realize ALL generations could well enjoy the decor that is so dated it must be seen.
    Written June 18, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Michael M
    Vancouver, Canada3,505 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    On display along Cambie Street near Vancouver City Hall , there are a small group of of headless cast-iron figures installed by the Vancouver Biennale …this public art collection adds to the very busy environment in this area..it is certainly worth the time to stop and reflect on these standing figures created by artist Magdalena Abakanowicz..important to display art throughout a busy city that stops us all to reflect on artistic displays…
    Written December 6, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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