Monuments/ Statues in Halifax

THE 10 BEST Halifax Monuments & Statues

Monuments & Statues in Halifax

Types of Attractions
Sights & Landmarks
Sights & Landmarks
Traveller rating
Neighbourhoods
Good for
10 places sorted by traveller favourites
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.

What travellers are saying

  • VancouverLil
    Langley, Canada714 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This statue is very moving. To see the man, leaving home with only a small suitcase in hand and leaving the family behind is representative of how our country was built.
    Written July 14, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • JB3
    Auckland Central, New Zealand241 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    A wonderful tribute to such a great tragedy. Simple, but very meaningful. We did however wonder if/when the bells would ring? As would have been very special to see and hear the bells. Well worth seeing.
    Written April 23, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • DeanMurphy2020
    Orlando, FL7,549 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Originally called “The Sailor,” this bronze sculpture of a sailor off to sea carrying a duffle bag on his shoulder was erected in 1991, at a cost of $300,000, quite a sum in those days. The Halifax Regional Municipality is now responsible for its preservation. The statue represents going to sea and devotion to duty. The sculptor was Peter Bustin.

    A bronze plaque at the base states: “The Sailor Statue represents those valiant young Canadians who served in both war and peace is symbolic of the thousands of sailors who were instrumental in the victory at sea and a fitting acknowledgement to those who continue to maintain the peace.”

    This statue inspired a replica in Londonderry, Northern Ireland [not to be confused with Republic of Ireland, my ancestral homeland], erected in 2013. The Halifax original depicts a cheerful sailor off to sea, whereas Northern Ireland’s version is a grizzled sailor returning home.
    Written August 14, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dbinhou7511
    Houston, TX1,646 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Learned some new things about Cunard when reading the plaques at the statue. Worthwhile to stop by and take a look. Important in immigration and cruise history.
    Written March 14, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • FiveGsplus9
    Oviedo, FL404 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Walking by, it was an honor to be able to enter the grounds and respect this historic cemetery in the heart of the city.
    Written March 22, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • DeanMurphy2020
    Orlando, FL7,549 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Established by France in 1604, L’Acadie, a coveted colony. The British took control in 1713 and renamed the region Nova Scotia [Latin for New Scotland]. Halifax was founded in 1749 forcing Acadian population to move to French territory. Acadians who remained were perceived as a threat. In 1757, British authorities launched systemic deportation, dividing families and communities, and seized all lands, dwellings and personalty. Nearly 10,000 people were forced into ships and deported to Anglo-American colonies, to England and to France, in what was called the Grand Dérangement or Great Upheaval. During the following decade, merely 1,600 Acadian survivors remained in Nova Scotia.

    Perhaps this is one factor that influenced Haligonians to accept/respect all cultures and ethnicities—which may make Haligonians amongst the friendliest people in the Western Hemisphere☺
    Written August 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • DeanMurphy2020
    Orlando, FL7,549 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This statue commemorating Lebanese immigrants was unveiled in Halifax, Nova Scotia [Latin for New Scotland], unveiled in September 2018. It portrays a Lebanese traveler adorned in traditional attire. The bronze plaque reads: ‘This monument is a universal symbol of a proud, strong, and globally united Lebanese community. The statue honors the early Lebanese settlers who, 130 years ago, established a presence in this country, sewing the bonds of loyalty, faith, and perseverance. We are thankful to our Nova Scotia community and for the enduring friendships built in our new home, Canada.’

    Canada welcomed Lebanese immigrants more than a century ago providing opportunities and freedom. The Lebanese-descent population in Halifax is 3.75 percent, though the first settlers arrived about 130 years ago.

    How fitting that Lyla, the tour director for our group of 36 visiting the Canadian Maritimes, is of Lebanese descent. Halifax is the center point of immigration. A mélange of cultures, traditions, languages, and fabulous cuisines await visitors. I found Haligonians—including those descended from other countries—to be the friendliest of all the 48 countries I’ve visited.
    Written August 19, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • DeanMurphy2020
    Orlando, FL7,549 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The bronze Winston Churchill statue fronts Halifax Memorial Library, at 5381 Spring Garden Road, just east of Brunswick Street. Although England’s Prime Minister during the mid-20th century was only 5 feet, 6 inches tall, sculptor Oscar Nemon modeled the 10-foot-tall statue from a photo of Churchill during a 1943 secret visit to Halifax. The sculptor created this massive stature to symbolize Sir Winston’s substantial contributions as Prime Minister, especially during and after the Second World War.

    In August 1943, Churchill secretly visited Halifax, en route to meet with President Roosevelt in Quebec City. It was a worst-kept secret: word of his visit spread quickly and crowds came to greet him. When Churchill visited again in 1944, he kept no secrets. He led a crowd in song as he boarded a train for Quebec City. England’s Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945, and again from 1951 to 1955. He visited Canada eight times and seemed to favor Halifax. Small wonder: it became a favorite city for me, and I was there for only a week. Haligonians do have a friendly and welcoming nature about them☺
    Written August 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • DeanMurphy2020
    Orlando, FL7,549 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    In 2017, sculptor Vassilis Vassili began grinding granite boulders that would become the curious sculpture “Passage.” He often thought about Anna Leonowens, who was an inspiration for the artwork although he did not know that her spirit and courage led to founding the Victoria School of Art and Design, later called NSCAD University. As a single mother of two in the 1800s with no income when her husband died, she became a governess. You may know her better as the governess in “The King and I.” Later in life, Anna migrated to Halifax and became involved in the community as a social activist, working to improve the lives of women and children.

    Vassili’s contribution is a nine-tonne sculpture carved from Nova Scotia granite. It was created during Sculpture Nova Scotia’s first outdoor waterfront symposium in 2015. Vassili’s art was commissioned by the NSCAD Alumni Association, which was pleased to see the legacy of NSCAD’s founder recognized through public art. The completed sculpture remained in in storage until an ideal location on the Halifax waterfront was secured. What better than at the foot of the Salter Lot near Bishop’s Landing. The central opening frames a view to the east, the Atlantic Ocean, and the world beyond Halifax Harbor (including India, Anna Leonowens’ birthplace). One polished granite wall remains natural gray-blue; the other is painted red, the passion color, representing Anna’s passion for life. The morning sun passes through the opening—symbolizing a fresh start for many in a new home.

    This sculpture is appropriate for Halifax, as many from countries around the world came to the most welcoming city in North America. Appropriately, it is near the Lebanese Immigrant statue and north of The Immigrant Statue at Pier 21.
    Written August 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • DeanMurphy2020
    Orlando, FL7,549 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Marlene Hilton Moore’s bronze sculpture is dubbed simply “The Volunteers.” Eight decades ago, during World War 2, Nova Scotia women and girls not allowed to enlist in the military sang, entertained, knitted scarves, sewed quilts, and served meals to hungry servicemen. Unveiled in November 2017, they’re now recognized for their volunteer work with a monument along the Halifax waterfront, near Pier 21, in front of Halifax Port Authority.

    The Halifax Women’s History Society chair, Janet Guildford, said, “This is the first monument to women in the city’s history. We’re elated to be the first to break the bronze ceiling in Halifax.” The mélange of bronze sculptures cost more than $500,000. The monument is the first to recognize women’s vital role in history.

    None of the individual sculptures on a granite platform is named, which may be symbolic for all female volunteers. The three life-sized figures represent three generations and ethnic origins: A young girl pulling a wagon full of salvaged metal, an African-Nova-Scotian woman holding a tray of coffee and sandwiches, and an older woman seated with a Mi’kmaq [indigenous person of the region] basket and knitting.

    In the States, the Tuskegee Airmen [African American military pilots not allowed to mingle with Caucasian comrades] were not honored. Not until 2007 when President George Bush and Congress acknowledge the dedication and service of Tuskegee Airmen in World War 2.
    Written August 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
Frequently Asked Questions about Halifax