Things to do in Hope

THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Hope

Things to Do in Hope


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Top Attractions in Hope

These rankings are informed by traveller reviews—we consider the quality, quantity, recency, consistency of reviews, and the number of page views over time.
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What travellers are saying

  • Busdrvr
    Durham, Canada12 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Hope is small and has several wood carvings on it's streets. Home to the first Rambo movie. Although his carving was missing we enjoyed the "be Rambo" cut out by the information center. Just missed the bears by the river and had a fabulous lunch in the Blue Moose on across from the park. There is a church there that is very old and a corner house with all kinds of bird houses. Nothing over the top but we enjoyed a couple hours exploring.
    Written November 26, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada14,357 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Our summer road trip adventure eventually took us to Hope. The primary reason for our visit was to patronize the Othello Tunnels; however, we also wanted to make best use of time while in the vicinity. Thus, after a quick lunch at the Hope Pizza Place, we made our way towards the site of the Hope Slide, just off Highway 3. Arriving at the pullout, the scar from the slide is readily visible and, let me tell you, any picture fails to do it justice. The debris field – littered as it is with massive boulders – and what’s left of Johnson Peak speak to the level of sheer destruction and chaos that occurred here 56 years ago. Information boards on site tell the tale.

    In brief, the slide occurred in the early morning of hours of 9 January 1965. Just after 7AM, half of Johnson Peak collapsed, sending an estimated 47 million cubic meters of rock, mud, trees and other debris tumbling over 1,800 meters to the valley below. The sheer volume and force of the debris completely displaced Outram Lake, which was located below the mountain. The slide also covered 3 kilometers of highway and, sadly, took 4 lives. For a detailed visual account of this natural disaster, I’d recommend seeing the Royal BC Museum’s “This Week in History” series.

    Even though so much time has passed, the Hope Slide’s impact is still visible and felt today. As a result of the slide, the highway had to be completely re-routed and now skirts the existing debris field. Curiously, a small section of the “old” highway can still be driven near the slide area, but nature is starting to take over (the paved section, while still in decent shape, has gotten quite narrow in some areas).

    When we visited, a couple of helicopters carrying water buckets flew by. BC’s fire season was well under way. Nature can indeed be tough, but maybe it’s her way of trying to keep us in line? We can be a challenging lot, after all.

    If you’re passing through Hope, I do recommend visiting this site. It is awe-inspiring and a stark reminder of nature’s power. Think of it this way: The Hope Slide is recognized as the second largest landslide in Canadian history, only behind the 2010 Mount Meager slide. Crazy!
    Written October 23, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alan G
    1 contribution
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Hope is a brilliant town. Went for first blood, got first blood!. Brian and Tracy at the visitors centre were lovely, could of talked to them all day about Rambo, great just great, a dream for ourselves, loved it so much.
    Alan and Pauline from UK
    Written June 22, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada14,357 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Established in 1986 and clocking in at a respectable 159 hectares, Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park is a truly magical place. On the one hand, you have the Othello Tunnels, which is what the park is most known for; on the other hand, you have the park’s epic geology, rushing water and beautiful flora. In a word, one could rightly argue that this park reflects British Columbia in microcosm.

    When most of us think of Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park, the Othello Tunnels immediately come to mind; and why shouldn’t they? They are, after all, the park’s most distinguishing feature. Originally built in 1914, as part of the historic Kettle Valley Railway, the 5 tunnels that make up Othello cut right through solid granite. As you walk through these dark, cavernous mouths, you cannot help but admire the creative engineering skill that went into these tunnels and what they meant for “connecting” British Columbia. At the same time, though, these tunnels also provide an opportunity to reflect on their darker history: Many a Chinese labourer lost their lives blasting into the solid granite.

    The railway was decommissioned in 1961 due to the propensity of washouts and rockslides in the area. A couple of decades later, the Othello Tunnels became part of Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park and now represent one of the Province’s most popular attractions. Indeed, human history, trestles, canyons and rushing water come together in an epic, almost Shakespearean way.

    Of course, Coquihalla Canyon is much more than just the Othello Tunnels. It also has epic natural scenery to share. While you can get some of this on the short 15-minute walk to the tunnels, I’d suggest the Hope-Nicola Valley Trail – a 5.6km loop – offers a greater opportunity to fully appreciate the park. Because it’s a loop, you can access the trail at 2 points: The main parking lot (trailhead is clearly visible) OR by walking through the Othello Tunnels and continuing on the trail from there. The hike will take you through lush forest, ferns and some pretty nice views. We only did a small segment of this trail because, at the time of our visit, BC was going through a record-breaking heatwave and it was nearly 40 degrees Celsius outside.

    At day’s end, whether you choose to do the loop trail or stick to the tunnels, you’ll still be experiencing some of BC’s most epic landscapes. The tunnels are an engineering marvel; the canyon walls and the rushing water below hint at the power of nature; and the beautiful greenery at every turn reminds you of why this place is Super. Natural. British Columbia.
    Written October 23, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • 1959Farmerboy
    Listowel, Canada136 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Our drive through the Fraser Canyon was a most enjoyable experience.We stopped in Hope because it was raining and we were promised sunshine the next day,which was indeed so.
    Written April 6, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Dillon
    Vancouver, Canada2 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Shout out to Tira and her team for a great experience, and amazing service! The Team was friendly, helping, all good and positive vibes 🔥🔥. Even with abit of Rain we had a really cool time. Loved the cold pool the most though tbh, was that waterfall feature lololol. Thank youse again and have a meke weekend.
    Written February 3, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Lhai A
    2 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    beautiful place to rest and eat. parking is spacious. definitely a great place to visit again to relax with rje family and friends.
    Written December 29, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • crossover604
    Richmond, Canada195 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    We hiked to the First Brothers on 2017.08.20. The weather was perfect with clear blue skies. We parked at the lower lot and walked an extra 2 km (each way). I would suggest parking at the upper lot to save your legs (especially on the way back). The whole trip was 22km and I did it in 7 hours + breaks. The climb to the First Brother was challenging as I had already walked about 10 km before reaching its base. The reward at the summit was priceless (360 degrees panoramic view). I highly recommend this trail for anyone interested in hiking.
    Written August 29, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Craig H
    Vancouver, Canada17 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Easy access from off the highway. Starts off on an unplowed road, then climbs up to and then along a pipeline right-of-way. Eventually, you turn into the trees before heading up to the ridge.
    Written February 27, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Cynthia F
    2 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    We stayed here for a weekend break from Vancouver, it's a nice little campground off the beaten track. It's quite rustic, only pit toilets, but the sites were well kept and fairly private. The trail by the lake wasn't that great, it sort of narrowed down to nothing and was quite overgrown. The lake itself was freezing cold, too cold for swimming, we jumped in for about 30 seconds just to wash the day's grime away. We did a day hike nearby which was fantastic, called the Hope Lookout Trail. It was a bit steep but was well maintained and had great views out over Hope and the valley.
    Written August 31, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • John S
    Abbotsford, Canada24 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Lots of neat trails and things to check out. Watch out for bears and lots of fallen trees! Always friendly people out and about!
    Written October 15, 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada14,357 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Japanese Friendship Garden is located in the larger Hope Memorial Park (see my review on this site). It was built in 1991 and dedicated to the 2,300 Japanese Canadians who were sent to the Tashame internment camp during the Second World War. In this respect, the garden isn’t in place for merely aesthetic reasons; it serves as a tangible reminder of “Hope” and “Friendship” and the need to maintain these things during even the toughest times. Thus, while the context for this small Friendship Garden is historical, we can still learn much from it if we have but the eyes to see and ears to listen. During the times of COVID we could all use a little bit of Zen, and this small garden of friendship offers us just that.

    While it may not be as impressive as the Japanese Garden in Butchart, this small Friendship Garden runs thick with history, meaning and culture. If you’re ambling about the Memorial Park, take a few moments to stop by here, take a photo (maybe get photobombed!), admire the foliage and “refresh” before continuing about your day.
    Written January 12, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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