Things to do in Masset

THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Masset

Things to Do in Masset

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Top Attractions in Masset

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What travellers are saying

  • Miguel R
    3 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I am Miguel Retamosa from Montevideo, URUGUAY. I am 32 years old and I would like to know how to apply to your company. And I have no problems traveling. I know basic English and will work at the US embassy for two years (I have a letter of recommendation) and will also work as a kitchen assistant. In addition, I adapt to any work task such as construction, also to order.
    Written February 29, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • TGB40
    Calgary, Canada442 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Hiked Tow Hill and the Blowhole Trails in Naikoon Provincial Park. Road to both are unpaved but very accessible Definitely do Tow Hill Lookout first and make a loop to the Blowhole and the east end of Agate Beach. The entire trails are on boardwalk but only the Blowhole is accessible by wheelchair as the Tow Hill trail has numerous stairs. If you can plan it, it is best to do the Blowhole during high tide so there is spray. Very enjoyable hike. Would highly recommend for the views and plant growth. En route to the trails you pass Agate Beach which is well worth a wonder along the beach looking for. On the south end of the park is a very doable hike to an old ship wreck. Some debate about wether it is 10 or 12 km. The park overall seems really well maintained and trails are clearly marked. Did not stay in the campgrounds.
    Written August 14, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • TGB40
    Calgary, Canada442 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Enjoyed the Dixon Entrance Museum. Spent about 1 hour. Lots to read. Information is well displayed. Worth a visit
    Written August 14, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • DadandCab
    Coffs Harbour, Australia1,217 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    We walked the sanctuary hike - in reverse by mistake which made any signage difficult to spot. Go to the sanctuary office in Masset before setting out on the hike & they'll set you straight!
    Written June 20, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada14,274 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Cape Fife Trail was established in 1910 as a settler wagon road to access parcels of land and serve as an important lifeline and entry point to East Beach. The wagon road originally started slightly north of the current marked route and terminated at Kumara Lake. The trail now known as Cape Fife was cut in 1972 by the Masset Lions Club, though it does connect with – and follow – large sections of the original route. At just over 11km one-way (signage says 10km, but this is wrong), it is a long but relatively easy hike with very little elevation gain. As you hike this route, you will encounter varied landscapes: Rich forest, delicate bogs, intricate sand dunes and endless beach. Taken as a comprehensive whole, Cape Fife offers a little something for everyone. Whether you choose to hike the whole route, part of it, or camp overnight at East Beach, is entirely up to you.

    To access the trail, drive north to Naikoon Provincial Park towards Taaw (Tow Hill). Park your vehicle at the Tow Hill parking lot. From here, walk across the Hiellen River Bridge You will see the Cape Fife trailhead to your right.

    The first 4 kilometers take you through a beautiful forest environment, including old growth cedars, hemlock and pine. Thick mosses of various shades of green carpet the ground and strategically placed boardwalks help navigate a number of potentially miry sections. After clearing the forest, you enter the bog ecosystem and begin crossing the Argonaut Plain. Unlike other trails on Haida Gwaii that take you through a bog environment, the Cape Fife Trail makes navigating this lengthy section relatively easy thanks to a number of short boardwalks and stepping logs along the route. Do maintain some caution, however, because some of the boardwalks are rotten and in dire need of replacement.

    At about the 7 kilometer mark you can hear the waves of Hecate Strait in the distance. The trail also begins a slow descending pattern as you make your way towards the beach. While this part of the trail is mostly clear, roots represent the most significant and sustained obstacle. About one kilometer out from the Cape Fife shelter and East Beach, we kept our eyes peeled for a side trail that apparently takes you to homestead remnants (as noted by Zenfolio), but we could not locate it. Oh well! Anyway, as you close in on Cape Fife, you descend some stairs and enter the home stretch! These last few meters, though, are covered with long beach grass, obstructing the trail from view. Once you clear the long grass, you are at the Cape Fife shelter. Built in a traditional longhouse style, the shelter represents a fairly luxurious reprieve and resting point: 4 bunkbeds, wood-stove and small table with guestbook. An outhouse and a couple of hammocks are also available on site. Curiously, cellular service is also available here. Kumara Lake, the original terminus of the wagon road, is visible about one-hundred meters north of the shelter.

    While Cape Fife is generally an easy hike the whole way, we would rate it as “moderate” because of the length. It is, however, quite well-used during the spring and summer months. When we hiked the route, we encountered a number of hikers going to, or coming from Cape Fife. Thus, you are never really alone on the trail. Just be sure to give yourself plenty of daylight and bring sufficient water. The average time to hike this route is 4 to 6 hours one-way.
    Written December 17, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • LLHH
    Vancouver, Canada1,180 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Short walk from the highway pullout. Open area with picnic tables and fire rings. Huge masses of moss a foot deep. They are amazing.
    Written June 21, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada14,274 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Situated within Naikoon Provincial Park, White Creek is a relatively flat 3.5km out-and-back trail. The trail, which is an early 20th century settler wagon road, begins on the west side of White Creek, near the bridge. You’ll see a small sign – the trailhead marker – indicating that the route is not maintained. Despite this, it’s clear the trail is “user maintained” because it was clear and easy to navigate for the duration of our hike.

    The first kilometer of the hike takes you through beautiful second growth forest, carpeted with thick green moss, along an unmistakable wagon road. As you walk this section it’s not difficult to imagine the old settlers, in their horse and buggy, trudging along to their homesteads. In the current day, besides the obvious road, the hand-dug ditches and corduroy bridges are all that remain of this pioneering era along White Creek.

    After about 30 minutes or so, you’ll emerge from the brush into what Go Haida Gwaii has described as “Haida Gwaii’s Serengeti.” The unique bog ecosystem – with its small ponds, grassland, twisted and stunted pines – are certainly reminiscent of the African Savannah! As you hike this section of the White Creek Trail, you’ll notice several small side trails, all of which provide access to the bog. I’d recommend taking your time here to explore, but do tread gently. Depending on the time of year you visit, it’s possible to observe Shooting Stars, Labrador Tea, Sundews, and a host of other plants endemic to this environment. Who knows, you might even hear the frat boy-like calls of male grouse in the distance!

    The bog section of the White Creek Trail runs for about 2.5 kilometers before you come upon the “trail ends” signage. If you’re wearing good boots, it is possible to cross Kliki Damen Creek and continue some 19 kilometers all the way to East Beach along what eventually becomes the Carr-Whittle Trail. If you do this, though, please note that the route is not marked.

    While there are other trails on Haida Gwaii offering access to bog environments (Nadu Homestead and Regier Lake, for example), White Creek is the most popular and, I’d suggest, photogenic. If you visit, take your time here. The mystical and magical effect of forest and bog still occupies and entices my mind!
    Written May 19, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • PookyCake
    Victoria, Canada14,274 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    I was first made fully aware of Masset Cemetery after browsing a couple blogs about Haida Gwaii late last year. In particular, it was a post written on HalloweenForum.com, of all places, that really captured my attention. There wasn’t much in the way of text or context, but the two images of a moss-covered cross just spoke to me: They were at once haunting and beautiful, perfectly capturing the essence of what most – if not all – cemeteries should be.

    When most of us think of cemeteries, we envision them as places to be avoided – as places of mourning, sadness and death. True, they are that to a certain degree: When the time comes to lay a loved one to rest, we cannot help but feel melancholy because a large and integral part of our world is suddenly gone; however, cemeteries are also much more than that. They also function as portals of remembrance whereby you can honour your loved one within the context of their culture and how they lived. Masset Cemetery probably does this better than most.

    As you walk this quaint cemetery it is impossible to ignore the strong feeling of spirituality throughout. Maybe it’s the lush, green moss that carpets the ground, covers some graves and creeps up the trees; maybe it’s the Sitka spruce which surrounds you and reaches up towards the heavens; maybe it’s the sound of waves crashing upon the shores of nearby Cemetery Beach; or, maybe it is all of these things coming together like a beautiful gestalt and illustrating place and space. Regardless, it gives the space a wonderful sense of calm – the perfect setting in which to both honour and reflect upon life.

    The various monuments housed inside Masset Cemetery offer us a unique window and perspective through which to view the local culture: Many of the graves are adorned with various treasures, a lot of which probably wouldn’t last a day in an urban environment. For example, you will come across graves lined with scallop shells; others will be covered in beautiful agates; and still others may be adorned with cedar roses, Japanese glass balls or Haida Watchmen figures. This, to me, is a beautiful expression of place, culture and history. The cemetery is unique to its space; the graves and treasures placed atop them paint a clear picture of Haida Gwaii’s multifaceted, complex culture; and it also alludes to the timeless history of Haida Gwaii via the ancient forest which surrounds it.

    Indeed, this is why I say Masset Cemetery captures “the essence of what most [. . .] cemeteries should be.” It tells us a story if we have but the eyes to see and ears to listen. The story may be happy or it may be sad, but it will nevertheless enrich us.

    Oh, and that moss-covered cross I spied in the blog post? It was there, sans moss. I guess I should’ve expected as much given that the blog was over eight years old at the time of viewing!
    Written October 16, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Katie C
    50 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    good selection of local artwork and souvenir items. the proprietor is friendly and helpful with suggestions for visitors. clean shop aesthetic makes it easy to find what you're looking for
    Written September 26, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Impossiblewish
    Fort Langley, Canada7 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Friendly staff, authentic Haida art. Indigenous owned and operated business. Carrying various items from screen printed T-shirts, to carved jewelry.
    Written October 17, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • paixful
    Lethbridge, Canada514 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A great selection with something for everyone and every budget. It is also wonderful to support the Haida Nation by shopping locally in Haida owned stores selling Haida created items.
    Written July 27, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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