Cheap Hostels in Province of South Tyrol

THE BEST Cheap Hostels in Province of South Tyrol

Cheap Hostels in Province of South Tyrol

Comfy stays at affordable prices, with plenty of options in popular neighbourhoods.

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#28 of 41 hotels in Tirolo / Dorf Tirol
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#7 of 10 hotels in Monguelfo-Tesido
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#3 of 8 Specialty lodging in Rabla
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#5 of 6 hotels in Valle di Casies

Cheap Hostels nearby destinations

  • Veneto
    One of Italy’s most visited regions, Veneto in the country’s northeast was independent for centuries until 1797, when Napoleon invaded. It then bounced among French, Austrian and Italian domination. Bordered by some of Europe’s most beautiful elements (the Adriatic Sea to its east, Lake Garda to its west, the Dolomites to its north, and the Po River to its south), Veneto is known for agriculturally rich valleys flowing down from Alps and for important cities like Venice, Verona and Padua.
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  • Trentino-Alto Adige
    Trentino-Alto Adige is made up of two provinces, the Italian-leaning Trento (or Trentino) in the south and the Germanic-leaning Alto Adige (or Südtirol, and also called Bolzano-Bozen, just to keep things interesting) in the north. Home to numerous picturesque towns, castles and historic sights, the main attraction here is the mountains. The stars of these are the Dolomites. Outdoor adventure opportunities abound year-round, with skiing, climbing and hiking among the most popular pursuits.
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  • Venice
    With its gondolas, canals, amazing restaurants, and unforgettable romantic ambiance, Venice is definitely a city for one's bucket list. Waterfront palazzos, palaces, and churches make drifting down the Grand Canal feel like cruising through a painting. To really experience Venice you must go to the opera or to a classical music performance, nibble fresh pasta and pastries, and linger in the exhibit halls of an art gallery. Label lovers will drool over the high-end shopping in Piazza San Marco.
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  • Jesolo
    Poised on the edge of the Venetian lagoon, Jesolo is one of Italy's most popular beach resorts, with millions visiting each year. A favourite with families, Jesolo offers up theme and water parks, an aquarium, and an 8-mile (13-kilometre) golden beach.
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  • Verona
    So splendid was mediaeval Verona that its reputation alone inspired Shakespeare to set two plays here (Romeo and Juliet and The Two Gentlemen of Verona). Though its connection to the actual Capulets is tenuous at best, the so-called Juliet's House draws half a million tourists per year, many of them keen on reenacting the balcony scene. Don't miss the Roman amphitheatre and the Palazzo Barberi.
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  • Lake Garda
    The largest of Italy’s fresh-water lakes, Lake Garda is located in northeast Italy. Tourists traveling here will find plenty of excursions and activities to keep them entertained year-round—everything from visiting hilly wine regions to exploring 14th-century castles. The towns and communities surrounding Lake Garda offer easy day trips from Venice, easily accessible by car or train. Major sights include the towns of Sirmione (which attracts most Lake Garda visitors thanks to its historic Rocca Scaligiera castle) and Riva del Garda (for the Varone waterfalls located nearby), as well as the region’s hills, which offer numerous hiking trails for adventurous walkers.
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  • Innsbruck
    Coveted by empires and republics throughout its history, Innsbruck was the seat of the imperial court of Maximilian I by the end of the 15th century. Trams make getting around the city quick, efficient and cheap. Explore the Tyrolean capital's history at Archduke Ferdinand II's 10th-century Schloss Ambras, the Tyrolean Folk Art Museum, the grand 15th-century Imperial Palace and Maximilian I's famous Golden Roof. One of Europe's most idyllic cities, Innsbruck is nestled in the heart of the Alps.
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  • Tirol
    Once known as The Land of the Mountains, the 10,000-square-mile province of Tirol is a wonderland of gushing rivers, lush meadows and rugged peaks. Fantastic hiking trails wind along paths through the Zillertal Alps. Famed resort towns confetti the mountainsides, including Kitzbühel, St. Anton, Ischgl and Seefeld, site of some events in the 1964 and 1976 Winter Games. Compact capital Innsbruck is a medieval gem. The Tirolean identity is strong: Expect to see lederhosen and feathered hats.
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Popular destinations for Cheap Hostels

  • Rome
    It’s nicknamed the Eternal City for a reason. In Rome, you can drink from a street fountain fed by an ancient aqueduct. Or see the same profile on a statue in the Capitoline Museum and the guy making your cappuccino. (Which, of course, you know never to order after 11 am.) Rome is also a city of contrasts—what other place on earth could be home to both the Vatican and La Dolce Vita?
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  • Berlin
    In progressive Berlin, the old buildings of Mitte gracefully coexist with the modern Reichstag. Don't miss top historic sights like the Berlin Wall, Checkpoint Charlie, the Brandenburg Gate and Potsdamer Platz. The city's great zoo makes for a fun break from touring the staider attractions.
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  • Paris
    Everyone who visits Paris for the first time probably has the same punchlist of major attractions to hit: The Louvre, Notre Dame, The Eiffel Tower, etc. Just make sure you leave some time to wander the city’s grand boulevards and eat in as many cafes, bistros and brasseries as possible. And don’t forget the shopping—whether your tastes run to Louis Vuitton or Les Puces (the flea market), you can find it here.
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  • Amsterdam
    Amsterdam is truly a biker’s city, although pedaling along the labyrinthine streets can get a little chaotic. Stick to walking and you won’t be disappointed. The gentle canals make a perfect backdrop for exploring the Jordaan and Rembrandtplein square. Pop into the Red Light District if you must—if only so you can say you’ve been there. The Anne Frank House is one of the most moving experiences a traveller can have, and the Van Gogh Museum boasts a sensational collection of works.
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  • Barcelona
    Stroll Las Ramblas and enjoy Barcelona's unique blend of Catalan culture, distinctive architecture, lively nightlife and trendy, stylish hotels. You'll find Europe's best-preserved Gothic Quarter here, as well as amazing architectural works by Gaudi. La Sagrada Familia, considered Gaudi's masterpiece, is still under construction (your entrance fee helps to fund the project). Feel like a picnic? Look no further than the rambunctious La Boqueria market, where you can stock up on local delicacies.
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  • London
    From Shoreditch’s swaggering style to Camden’s punky vibe and chic Portobello Road, London is many worlds in one. The city’s energy means that no two days are the same. Explore royal or historic sites, tick off landmarks from your bucket list, eat and drink in exclusive Michelin-starred restaurants, enjoy a pint in a traditional pub, or get lost down winding cobbled streets and see what you stumble across – when it comes to London, the possibilities are endless.
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  • Madrid

    Madrid is the financial and cultural hub for Spain, and much of Southern Europe. There is a huge amount to see and do there, as well as excellent nightlife in terms of bars, restaurants, clubs and entertainment. As the area has been inhabited since Roman times, there are also plenty of historical sites to explore and enjoy. At the other extreme, you can also visit the Bernabéu stadium, home of Spanish football giant Real Madrid. This is usually popular with the younger members of the family, and many of the older ones! For art lovers you are torn between the Prado Museum, with works from the 12th to 19th Centuries including Goya, Velasquez and Rubens, or you can go to the Reina Sofia Museum for art from the 20th Century and beyond. The Reina Sofia houses Picasso's most famous painting Guernica, as well as key works by artists such as Salvador Dali - it gets incredibly busy but is a crucial place to visit!

    While Madrid is a huge city, and it is easily possible to spend a whole holiday exploring, there is also a lot to see outside the city itself. Suggested excursions include Toledo, former capital of the country and a medieval city full of charm, and Segovia with its extraordinary castle which was used as inspiration for Walt Disney's iconic castle logo.

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  • Edinburgh
    Edinburgh is Scotland’s capital city, renowned for its heritage, culture and festivals. Take a long walk around the centre to explore the World Heritage Sites of the Old Town and New Town, as well as all the area’s museums and galleries. Then stop for a delicious meal made from fresh Scottish produce before heading out to take in one of Edinburgh’s many events — including the famous summer festivals of culture, or the Winter Festivals of music, light and ceilidhs.
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  • Lisbon
    Lisbon, the capital city of Portugal, has become an increasingly popular place to visit in recent years, with a warm Mediterranean climate in spite of its place facing the Atlantic Ocean. Full of bleached white limestone buildings and intimate alleyways, Lisbon's mix of traditional architecture and contemporary culture makes it the perfect place for a family holiday. Things to do in Lisbon: As Portugal's capital, there is a lot to see and do in Lisbon. Even exploring the city centre will take a few days out of a family holiday as there is no real central district, although Praça do Comércio is a good central place to start, in Baxia, or Rossio, the city's main square which has a sort of Trafalgar Square feel to it. Or you might try climbing up the Cristo Rei, a huge statue of Christ with spectacular views across the whole city. The Castelo de São Jorge also offers great views and isn't quite such a steep climb. A short tram ride to the west of Lisbon will also bring you to Belem, where you can explore attractions like the Belem Tower and the Belem Cultural Centre, which features a fantastic art collection including works by Dali, Picasso, Warhol and Magritte. In downtown Lisbon, you'll also want to visit the Gulbenkian, which has to be Portugal's answer to the British Museum full of fascinating cultural artifacts and with some superb gardens in the grounds. It's possible to have a fascinating educational family holiday in Lisbon, and there are also plenty of great beaches to work on your tan.
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  • New York City
    The first time you go to New York, go ahead and be a sight-seer—everyone should visit the Statue of Liberty, the Met, Times Square, etc. But on a return trip, pick a neighbourhood and go deep. You’ll find hole-in-the-wall bars, great delis, quirky shops… exploring the non-touristy side of New York is an incredibly rewarding experience for a traveller.
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