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Knitting Needle Question

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MA
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Knitting Needle Question

Hello - I am coming to Amsterdam soon from the US. I checked the US TSA website and I am allowed to carry knitting needles on the plane so I can knit during the flight. Does anyone know where I would find out The Netherland's policy of carrying knitting needles on the plane? I would be upset if they were confiscated on my flight home. Also, if someone could suggest a good yarn store in Amsterdam, that would be great! I am a horribly anxious flyer and knitting on the plane helps to calm me down. Thank you.

MA
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1. Re: Knitting Needle Question

I just found an old thread here with a link to a knitting shop, so I am all set with that now. My question as to the knitting needles on the plane still stands, thanks!

Amsterdam, The...
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2. Re: Knitting Needle Question

klm.com/travel/…restricted_baggage.htm

Not mentioned in the restricted articles on that link and I can't find anything about knitting needles on the Schiphol site either.

I imagine they would be ok especially if they are made from plastic.

Oregon
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3. Re: Knitting Needle Question

I was allowed to take my plastic round loom and the hook/pick (which is partly metal) with me on a flight from Schipol to Venice with no problems (although they did ask me what it was, as they had not seen one before. I ended up demonstrating it for a few people and giving them information on where to buy one.) There was also a lady with regular knitting needles, but plastic and not sharp at all, on the plane with us. I think one of their bigger concerns is what you might be cutting your yarn or thread with. I understand types of cutters/clippers that have razor-blade like cutting surfaces are not allowed. They had no problem with my tiny key chain size Swiss army knife (but I've had those confiscated at US airports more than once.) I've also flown Schipol to the US with the same set up with no problems. And also watched others on the flights to the US knitting with regular needles. Is this a Delta or KLM flight you're taking? Have you by chance looked at the information the airline might have on their website? I've always been a bit nervous about this sort of thing as well, and I always put my equipment and supplies in large clear ziploc bags, so they can easily see what it is and it offers some protection to my work if they pull it out to look at it. If you still have concerns about your flight back, you might also consider asking local personnel directly when you land. At least then if their answers were for some strange reason negative or gave you doubts, you'd know to pack the needles in your checked baggage for the flight back, but you'd have them on the way out and while you're here.

As for yarn stores, was it my previous posts in that link you found? Did you follow the link to the cross-stitch posts as well? If not, here's a bit of repeat info on one particular shop in the Albert Cuyp market. It's a fun jaunt there anyway:

The shop is Jan de grote Kleinvakman on Albert Cuypstraat 203A, Amsterdam. www.jandegrotekleinvakman.nl. The shop carries a wide assortment of various craft and haberdashery items. They also sell yarns and knitting items. They are a rather unique shop for this area, considering the variety of items they sell.

Also, depending on what type of yarn you want or like to knit with, if, on your site seeing routes or near your hotel, you pass a BLOKKER (look for the little area with beads and other small craft items, as this one is primarily a household goods shop) or especially a ZEEMAN'S chain store (selling textile goods), you will find some very basic but inexpensive (for here, that is) selection of acrylics and acrylic blends, often with a bit of wool. They sell some basic but pretty "fun fur" type eyelash yarns as well. Sometimes even a Kruidvat chain store will have yarns in their "misc" sale aisles as well. Never a guarantee, as such things are often very seasonal in nature at the chain shops, but maybe worth a look if you pass by one.

Best wishes!

MA
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4. Re: Knitting Needle Question

Thanks, everyone. I have bamboo knitting needles, so I'll bring those and I think it'll be fine but if not, they can be replaced. Mongrel, the thread I saw was for the shop de Afstap on Oude Leliestraat. I checked out the website and it looks like a nice shop. I will also be going to the Cuypmarkt, so I'll take the address of the Kleinvakman shop with me too. We're going on Icelandair, and I have posted for info on the Iceland forum as well.

upstate NY
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5. Re: Knitting Needle Question

What is it about you crazy knitting ladies? My wife was just showing me her yarn and needles she's taking w/ her on our trip in 2 weeks. She says they take up much less space than all her quilting gear. I agree.

My wife is a retired soldier. You should have seen her face when the guard told her she couldn't go into the US Capital w/ her knitting needles. My wife had been working on her wool socks while we waited in line....and then to be turned away! I thought I was going to see how they can be used as a weapon.

The best reaction she gets is at hockey games. You just don't expect to see somebody knitting away while watching a game. Way too civilized.

As far as scissors, she has a metal disk that hangs around her neck that has little cutting knicks in it, seems to work well. Oh, and pick up some of the plastic needles that light up so you can knit in the dark. Great for annoying the husband while driving at night.

Have a great trip!

Oregon
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6. Re: Knitting Needle Question

Oh, I think you'll be fine with bamboo needles. The shiny, flashy metal ones seem to be the ones that look the scariest and occasionally give people pause. Sorry to say I have no experience with Icelandair, so hopefully your other inquiries will bear fruit there.

De Afstap is a lovely shop. Much better selection (for here) than the others I mentioned, but also correspondingly higher prices. Have you been to the Netherlands before? The sticker shock can be a serious one, but often the quality in a shop like De Afstap is also quite high. It depends on what type of knitter you are and how experienced you are and what you like to work with. Hopefully, TA has managed to give you enough options to keep you happy and calm on your flight. :)

Oregon
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7. Re: Knitting Needle Question

You're right, there is a certain type of "craziness" to knitters, quilters, seamstresses etc. etc. etc. But it's the "good" kind of crazy (says the knitter, quilter and seamstress....) If I knit in public here, I'll draw a curious crowd. It can be fun when traveling, though. It gives you a great way to break the ice and get people talking.

The type of cutting implement you're referring to is also one of the ones I was referring to. The cutting surface is often provided by a razor type blade inside the round part. I haven't been to the States in over 6 months, but the last I knew, these were still not allowed, because they can be broken open and the blade used that way, or they can be used to sharpen another type of weapon (their words, not mine.) I usually check the latest no-no lists, but these specialty items are often not on them and even then, they can be subject to individual interpretation. I watched one of these cutters be confiscated from a lady in front of me on that last US flight. It can be a real challenge to obtain correct information on things like this. I usually either err on the side of caution or make sure I don't take anything I'm not willing to give up.

And I really would have gotten a laugh out of seeing your wife's expression when they told her the needles couldn't go in with her! I'll bet mine would have been similar.

upstate NY
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8. Re: Knitting Needle Question

Muppet- No not the rotary wheel cutters, those you could hurt someone with. The one she hangs around her neck looks like it's made from brass, kinda like a small Inca medallion, w/ small 'nicks' on the edge that cuts the yarn.

If she wasn't off to a quilting class I could get the technical name.

Yes, it is a good type of crazy....says the husband taking his wife to Europe for the 25th year wedding anniversary. A very good type.

Oregon
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9. Re: Knitting Needle Question

No, it's not a rotary cutter I'm referring to. Those have an almost entirely open blade and are usually much larger. It is the smaller, round "medallion" like one I'm talking about too. I use and like them myself. They are made in various ways, and I understand some of them might be airline acceptable now, but quite a few varieties were sold at various times that apparently are not. Some of them can be opened in various ways to change or remove the internal blade. It was the medallion type that I witnessed being confiscated this past November. I can't be certain it wasn't just that airline employee being particularly sensitive at that time for some reason, but the reasons they gave in response to the lady's questions were to site policy. I do remember (and this was years ago and closer to 9/11) that at one time this type of cutter was indeed on the specific list of some US airlines as being not allowed. There were long discussions about it on various popular internet knitting/sewing chat sites. The last time I checked, though, I didn't see it specifically listed. I was actually quite surprised it was prohibited, as I would have thought this type of cutter was indeed safer all around, since it's mostly designed so you don't stab or cut yourself on it and is safer to use in a moving vehicle or where you could be jostled. But when they tell you you have to give it up, you don't have much choice, and it can be a major inconvenience if that's what you were counting on. I mentioned it mostly because of that fairly recent experience and so the OP would be also be reminded to look for that type of information regarding her upcoming flight.

And what a wonderful reason for what I hope will be a wonderful trip for you. 25 years is really something to celebrate. We honeymooned here and are also coming up on our 25th and always said we'd do the same trip again, but now that we live here, we're having to come up with an alternative plan! It's been a lovely spring here, though. I hope the weather holds fair for you.

MA
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10. Re: Knitting Needle Question

Mongrel, thanks for the sticker shock warning! I'm prepared. I'd only be looking for something that I couldn't easily find here at home. If it is super expensive and nothing substantially different from what I can find here in my local wool shop, then I probably won't buy. I'm a bit new to knitting.