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Altitude sickness??

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Macon, Georgia
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348 posts
92 reviews
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Altitude sickness??

Will be in your area in August... First night staying in Boulder ,then on to Aspen for a few nights.. Then back to the Denver area.... Do you think we will have any altitude sickness... I remember when I was about 10, going up on Pikes Peak and getting so sick at the summit...( Headache and nausea/vomiting) Want to avoid that and would love opinions/tips . Thanks

Nederland, Colorado
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9,340 posts
12 reviews
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1. Re: Altitude sickness??

There's no way for us to know how you will react.

Stay hydrated and don't over-exert yourself the first day or so.

There's a lot of info already here. It's one of the top questions asked.

Go to this page tripadvisor.com/ShowForum-g28927-i252-Colora…

look at top questions about Colorado (top right) and click on "What about the altitude?"

Edited: 10 June 2011, 18:18
Macon, Georgia
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348 posts
92 reviews
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2. Re: Altitude sickness??

Thanks, I will check out those posts.

Miami, Florida
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2,606 posts
37 reviews
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3. Re: Altitude sickness??

The answer to your problems is to get a prescription from your doctor for DIAMOX. We are from Florida and frequent Colorado. I suffered our first trip. So glad I found this solution.

To reduce the incidence of Acute Mountain Sickness acetazolamide is sometimes taken prophylactically, anywhere between 125 milligrams (mg) to 1000 mg per day,[8][9] starting a few days before going to higher altitudes. Such use is recommended for those ascending from sea level to 3000 meters (9800 feet) in one day, or for those ascending more than 600 meters (2000 feet) per day once above an altitude of 2500 meters (8200 feet).[10][11] Also, prophylactic use is recommended for those with a significant history of acute mountain sickness.

Jacksonville...
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109 posts
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4. Re: Altitude sickness??

As Babalax said, there's no way for us to know. Only you and your doctor would know if you need to be medicated. I am also a FL native (never lived anywhere else), but I had no problems with altitude at Grand Canyon N. Rim - 8800'. Only a little light headed when I started running around. Drink lots of water even if you don't feel thirsty. If time allows, increase your altitude slowly. Don't exert yourself til you know how you will react.

Charleston, South...
Destination Expert
for Charleston, South Carolina, Telluride
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10,250 posts
34 reviews
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5. Re: Altitude sickness??

I am from Charleston and lived at the beach (basically sea level), I go to Telluride several times a year, elevation of our house approx 9200 ft. I usually get a bad headache the 1st day only and for the 1st few days if I hike, walk up stairs, etc I find that my heart rate gets fairly high and I get somewhat sort of breath. I am in pretty good shape and exercise regularly. I think that people who are pretty much out of shape tend to feel the shortness of breath and increased heart rate even more.

As mentioned above, it is really difficult to tell how any particular individual will respond. For me personally, I find that the Diamox does not help me. I drink LOTS of water the 1st few days and NO alcohol. I miss having a glass of wine at dinner, but I find that I do much better if I skip it.

Good luck!

Edited: 11 June 2011, 11:59
WestSlope,CO
Destination Expert
for Colorado
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9,744 posts
153 reviews
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6. Re: Altitude sickness??

The elevation of Aspen is 7890, below the 8000 ft level that is often deemed the altitude where people begin to show more effects, and well below that fast Pike's Peak ascent. So you may very well be just fine. But it's best to be informed and prepared.

One suggestion I've read would be to spend two nights in Boulder to give yourself a little more time to acclimate. Get some light exercise at the intermediate altitude of Boulder--walking, sightseeing, shopping, and drive to a higher elevation for a few hours (maybe Nederland or Estes Park). If you find once you get to Aspen that you're feeling slightly ill, maybe you could adjust your plan to spend another night at the lower elevation of Glenwood Springs. "Climb high, sleep low." That's the reason mountain climbers establish increasingly higher base camps.

Of course, our advice is not intended as a substitute for medical advice. The Institute for Altitude Medicine at Telluride has a link for medical providers who don't deal with this problem often and might not be familiar with the latest research, so you can show it to your doctor. It also has tons of information to help you recognize what is a normal reaction to altitude (i.e. mild shortness of breath) and what would be more serious and require medical attention.

http://altitudemedicine.org/

Denver, Colorado
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30 posts
13 reviews
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7. Re: Altitude sickness??

chug chug chug....water that is. it really is the key to a safe and successful vacation to the high country :)

Macon, Georgia
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348 posts
92 reviews
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8. Re: Altitude sickness??

Thanks, at least now I know somewhat to expect.

sudbury
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10 posts
97 reviews
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9. Re: Altitude sickness??

Great advice, we just came back from Aspen and we both suffered Altitude sickness, headache, shortness of breath, sleep disturbances, most of the attendees on our conference developed some form of it, so be prepared as mentioned above...easy on alchol consumption first few days, our hotel actually had oxygen available to purchase in room.

Michigan
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3 posts
6 reviews
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10. Re: Altitude sickness??

I have had all those symptoms mentioned here, first during my first two trips to Denver, and then in the mountains at higher altitudes. I did get a script of Diamox and it was a life saver. It does make carbonated beverages taste awful when you drink them, but I found if I took it the first couple days....then went without, I was just fine. You do have to really focus to drink drink drink water all day long though. My friend was fine the first day we were in Vail, and started getting all the signs the second day, but felt better within half an hour of taking a Diamox. Its worth it to have on hand and not have your vacation ruined.

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