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Daffodils In Running Springs

Running Springs
1 post
1 review
Daffodils In Running Springs

Anyone know the story about all the daffodils? They seem to be every where. I was just wondering if anyone knew where they came from.

Southern California
Level Contributor
998 posts
11 reviews
38 helpful votes
1. Re: Daffodils In Running Springs

"More than five acres of mountain landscape are host to one million daffodils, accented by assorted other bulbs such as fritillarias, hyacinths, muscari, and tulips. Some of the flowers are in drifts that spill down the steep slopes; others stand in large beds. All were planted, one at a time, by one woman -- Gene Bauer. She started 38 years ago, inspired by a few daffodils in a neighbor's garden. Bauer planted 48 daffodils in the fall of 1958. Needless to say, they thrived. Since then she's planted more daffodils each fall, but in the thousands. Some years, Bauer plants as few as 8,000 bulbs. In the fall of 1993, she planted 35,000. It's a kind of gardening zeal that makes the spring bulb ambitions of most of us seem rather paltry. Every slope cleared, every trail carved out of the hillside, every bulb planted -- all the hard work -- has been done by Gene and her husband, Dale, but mostly by Gene. Or as she puts it, "The work is done by two hands, two feet and a body minus a brain." Why daffodils? "First of all because they are beautiful and sturdy. But also because the bulbs are toxic. Gophers, squirrels and all the other critters that feast on tulips and other bulbs leave daffodils alone," says Bauer. Running Springs, California, sits at a 5,500-foot elevation, well above most of the smog in the Los Angeles basin. Ecologically, it's a transition zone between chaparral and yellow pine forest. More importantly, it has a distinct cold season, which suits the daffodils just fine. Over the hilly five acres grow native black oak, incense cedar, white fir and Coulter, knobcone, sugar and ponderosa pines. Anyone can visit during peak bloom time, early March to early April. The garden is located below Running Springs, California, in the San Bernardino Mountains."

http://frodo.tackettblake.com/pipermail/ncds/2004-December.txt

Los Angeles
1 post
1 review
2. Re: Daffodils In Running Springs

Thanks for the daffodil information and the inspiring notes about the five acres and its creator. We were there visiting her garden about two years ago and want to visit again this year. Which two or three weeks will she be "open" to the public? We need to plan our trip around her showing of the garden.....when will she post the dates? Will it be noted in the Rim of the World News ahead of time too? Thanks again. Barb

Los Angeles...
Level Contributor
1 post
18 reviews
38 helpful votes
3. Re: Daffodils In Running Springs

I was wondering the same thing. The website can only handle so many vistors (due to bandwidth cost concerns) and it seems to be over limit already this month. It's an "early spring" because of the plentiful rain this year so I'm thinking the flowers should be ready in a week or two. Anyone know?

Cupertino...
1 post
4. Re: Daffodils In Running Springs

this, 2009, is the last year they will be open for visitors, i understand - and the gardens are to be open the last week of March and the first week of April - b in Cupertino

5. Re: Daffodils In Running Springs

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