We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.
Save
Book In Advance
  
Ways to Experience Temple of Amun
from US$75.00
More Info
Reviews (81)
Filter reviews
26 results
Traveller rating
23
2
1
0
0
Traveller type
Time of year
LanguageAll languages
More languages
23
2
1
0
0
Show reviews that mention
All reviews ram headed sphinxes hypostyle hall complex columns karnak temple egypt nile site
Filter
Updating list...
1 - 10 of 26 reviews
Reviewed 5 days ago

Keep in mind how huge the complex is. It's mostly impossible to see it all in just one visit. The temple can be reached either by taxi, or by motorboat.

Thank andr_h294
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed April 20, 2018

Karnak has got to be the best place I saw during my study tour to Egypt. It's absolutely majestic and well excavated and preserved. In places the paint on the reliefs seems merely a few hundred years old instead of thousands of years.

It's easy to spend the day exploring Karnak and I'd recommend it. Take water. Wear a hat and comfortable shoes. Take a lot of photos, but also stop in the shade of the enormous pillars and really look at the magnificence.

It's a crowded site, but as you spread out and go into the temples and toward the back of the complex there are fewer and fewer people, especially as the day goes on. There is a small cafe where you can get a drink (toward the back). I spotted two toilet areas, a trailer at the back, and another when you first enter—go left.

Thank S. R. K
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed April 4, 2018 via mobile

The entire Karnak temple complex is beautiful and majestic. This temple dedicated to Amun Ra, has beautiful carvings, still painted in places. The avenue of ram headed sphinxes is very imposing. And the Hypostyle hall here is the largest in the world, with 134 towering columns.

Thank NidhiC_12
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed February 16, 2018

Luxor temple has a worth visit in day and night both. This too must visit and Amun temple is part of Luxor only

Thank Moumita T
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed November 18, 2017

The Temple of Amun was definitely one of the most magnificent Egyptian accomplishments we experienced during our stay in Luxor. Located within the Temple of Karnak area, it is a very dynamic architectural wonder. Definitely a must see attraction while in Luxor.

Thank Dao1949
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed September 18, 2017

The Temple of Amun reveres him, his wife, & his son if I remember correctly. It is nearby the larger Karnak complex. It is also close to the Nile.

Thank chadwickem2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed May 16, 2017

You can ignore the sellers and walk. Lots of hassle if you want to buy one thing for a family, better to just walk and know what you want!

Thank kart718
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed May 14, 2017

One of the great ancient monuments of Egypt and the world.This is really one not to miss. Be lost in wonder and how they created this giant structure 3000+ years ago

Thank Martin_Christopher
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed April 10, 2017

Having a great tour guide is for sure a plus!!! one of the places that is so mesmerizing and breath taking!!

Thank mbashari
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed March 3, 2017

When visiting this temple, bring along a photocopied map from a tourist guidebook to help orient yourself even if you visit with a guide. The map will show a layout of this temple with its many sections and note the important features which you can explore when the guide gives you free time. Amun was the main god worshiped in this temple, but the Karnak complex (80 EGP) has temples for other gods too - for example, his wife Mut and his son Khonsu. Most visitors just focus on visiting the Temple of Amun, probably because of its huge size - the largest religious building in the world even today! Our visit lasted 2 hours. Come early in the morning as this attraction gets very busy by 10:30 am.

Every section of this temple has something noteworthy to see. Many pylons - high walls - separate these sections into areas where probably different activities took place. For example, the open courtyard was a more public place for receiving/storing the gods' travelling barques. Next the mysterious hypostyle hall with its 134 papyri bud columns was an opportunity for the 2 pharaohs, Seti and Ramses who built it, to show themselves in a good light making food offerings to Amun. This Hall had many reliefs and deserves some time to examine them. I couldn't really distinguish the quality of the images in the north and south sections of this Hall. This hall was probably used as a throughfare to the sanctuary area. The sanctuary area was the oldest part of the temple and the holiest because in this area the god Amun was kept. Probably only priests who looked after Amun (washing, placing food offerings, displaying the god in a special niche) would be allowed in this area. Many small side rooms in this area were used to store offerings and associated religious activities. This sanctuary area was still in ruins and I couldn't clearly see these rooms. Hatshepsut's and Tuthmosis' obelisk were placed in this area and these stood out as the best attraction in the sanctuary area. Everywhere I looked surfaces of walls and columns were filled with hieroglyphs and reliefs which described and showed either offerings made to gods, a pharaoh's military success (Battle of Kadesh scenes on the outside of a pylon), or a pharaoh's accomplishments (Tuthmose's Botanic Garden). The reliefs varied in clarity and completedness; most lacked color. It was fun to try my hand at reading the hieroglyphics, but mostly I was awestruck by the height, width and age of the temple and the skills of its artisans.

Some things I enjoyed seeing: At the entrance, the ability to examine up close the double row of ram headed sphinxes. Each had a small statue placed between the lion's front paws. Behind the first pylon, the rubble brick heap was used as a ramp to construct and decorate that pylon. The colossal statues of Ramses II that guarded the entrance to the Hypostyle Hall. The forest of columns in the hypostyle hall (perhaps it was these columns that inspired Gaudi to create the towering tree-like columns in his Barcelonean cathedral). Somehow the obelisks didn't seem that tall in comparison to those soaring columns in the Hall. The clear reliefs in Tuthmose's Botanic Hall of plants showed the plants and animals he brought back from his expeditions. The Sacred Lake seemed uninviting where Amun's priests probably washed themselves before entering the sanctuary area to perform their duties. The Sacred Scarab statue close to the Sacred Lake, however, did attract Chinese visitors to circle it several times hoping perhaps that would ensure some luck in their love life.

The Temple of Amun remains a testimony of the importance that the ancient Egyptians attached to this god. It is a "must see" when visiting Luxor.

Thank retireeVancouver
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
View more reviews