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“If you happen to be in Tula ...”

Tula Museum of Samovars
Ranked #7 of 126 things to do in Tula
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Reviewed 6 March 2015

It's very much an oddity museum, exhibits can be comfortably viewed in 30 mins. If you miss it, not to worry. Having said that, it was very charming and is right next to the kremlin. Gift shop is also quite ok.

Thank Grahamek
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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6 - 10 of 370 reviews

Reviewed 11 September 2013

Very small (and very cheap) museum. Just go there if you have particular interest in Tula and its traditions, or if you have time. Quite fun to see all those specially backed cakes sorted by occasions. Be sure you buy the small souvenir at the end.

Thank AroundTheGlobe000
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 3 September 2013

the Museum of Samovars in Tula is like a well kept secret. Friends in this city escorted me there unexpectedly and I was delighted at the exhibits and developments of the famous Russian appliance. Since attending I purchased a large Samovar and can recognize its roots as manufactured in Tula.

1  Thank burmaford
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 13 June 2012

A samovar is traditionally a device used to heat water for tea, and the word can loosely be translated as "self boiler".
To boil the water inside a samovar, the pipe is filled with solid fuel such as pine cones, charcoals and wood chips which are set on fire. A small tea pot is used to brew a tea concentrate. The tea pot is often placed on top of a samovar to keep it heated with the passing hot air. The first Samovar ever was made by Lisitsyn brothers in Tula in 1778.

This museum has a wide variety of different samovars, and especially for foreigners interested in traditional Russian artefacts this is a great place to visit. If you are not much into these things, don't bother.
The local proverb is "don't bring a samovar to Tula"

1  Thank jojimbo
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 4 days ago via mobile
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Thank mixailkibirev
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC

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